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We all have a creative beast lurking inside of us, just waiting to be unleashed. Use these 5 exercises to help you unleash your creative beast.

5 Ways to Unleash Your Creative Beast

We all have a creative beast lurking inside of us, just waiting to be unleashed. Use these 5 exercises to help you unleash your creative beast. 

We all have a creative beast lurking inside of us, just waiting to be unleashed. Use these 5 exercises to help you unleash your creative beast.

Here’s the story.

Whether you believe you are a creative person or not (we can argue about that another day), within each of us is some untapped creativity. It’s time to let that creativity out. It’s time to unleash your creative beast. Easier said, than done, right?

Actually, no. It might not happen instantly, but if you start to practice your creativity, I promise you will see results.

If you start writing *everyday, you will become a better writer.

If you start knitting *everyday, you will become a better knitter.

If you start drawing *everyday, you will become a better artist/illustrator/other.

*You don’t actually have to do it everyday, but you need to practice with some regularity.

You get my point. If you want to think of yourself as creative person, you have to put in the practice. There’s no way around it – sorry!

But, getting started practicing your creativity can be a little intimidating, especially if you haven’t done it in awhile – or ever! So here are 5 quick ways you can use to get started practicing your creativity today. You probably won’t use these ideas forever, but it’s a good place to start. If you go through each of these, by end you will likely have come up with an idea of how you want to practice your creativity (writing, drawing, knitting, welding, jewelry-making, weaving, carpentry, painting, illustrating, card-making, photography, writing/playing music, singing, etc.)

Download your workbook here and get started with these 5 Ways to Unleash Your Creative Beast.

We all have a creative beast lurking inside of us, just waiting to be unleashed. Use these 5 exercises to help you unleash your creative beast.

 

Number 1 – PLAY WITH COLOR

Color is all around us, whether you find beauty in palette nature provides us with or if there is nothing more inspiring to you than opening a new box of colored pencils, this one’s for you.

Go on an adventure and hunt for colors. You get to make up the rules for this adventure: can they only be colors you find around your house? Colors found in nature? Colors you see as you take a walk around your block? You decide. Grab a camera or notebook and head outside. Let the world around you inspire you.

Now that you have colors on the mind, it’s time for your challenge.

Choose a group of people. It could be your friends, your family, or even your characters from your favorite book or TV show. Assign each person a color based on personality traits. Use what you know about this person to get it just right. Get creative – you don’t have to just use a basic color like “purple.” You can create your own specific names for a very specific shade of purple or combination of blue and purple. Try it now!

Number 2 – DO SOMETHING THAT SCARES YOU

When it comes to creativity, many of us have felt the fear. It grips you and doesn’t let go until you decide to back away and not try that new creative practice. Or you decide to not share your work with the world. Or you decide not to stand up and say yes to an opportunity. Whatever the reason for it, it’s that fear that overcomes you, even if you are normally a confident person.

When I first started greens + blues co., I didn’t tell anybody besides my husband about it for a long time. It even took me a few months to share it with my best friend and my sisters. Why? Because I had never done anything like this before. What if they didn’t get it? Or they thought it was dumb? Or that I was bad at it? Specifically when I first started greens + blues co., I didn’t know really how to explain it or how to explain why I started it other than I wanted to and felt like I had to – it was calling me and I couldn’t escape. Also, I just felt stupid talking about creativity out loud because all of the previous conversations I had about it took place in my head.

Here’s the thing, I have never had a problem with confidence. But, launching greens + blues co. was so different than anything I have ever done before. It took me a long time before it got easier for me to talk about (almost two years, yeesh!)

Beyond just launching greens + blues co., every step I have taken a long that way was scary at some point – continually pushing my out of my comfort zone. However, I have not regretted any of it. Even when I have pitched people ideas and I get a no (or more often, no response). Every scary thing I have done has been beneficial for me.

Okay, enough about me. Back to you. What scares you when it comes to your creativity? That’s a great place to start!

Is it starting a new creative practice? Maybe you have always thought about painting, but as an adult it makes you feel so silly to take a beginner class or to just be bad at something.

Or does the possibility of sharing your work scare you? Maybe you have written story upon story upon story so you clearly have no problem practicing your creativity, but the idea of someone else reading any of it scares the shit out of you. In that case, you definitely need to share your work.

Or is it saying yes to a new opportunity that scares you? Maybe someone has asked you to collaborate on something outside of your comfort zone, or you have an opportunity to learn something new. Whatever it is – say yes and do it!

Your challenge is simple: write down what scares you and do it. It doesn’t have to be major like self-publish a book, but rather something you could do in the next five minutes, like email a friend a copy of a story you wrote. Or, Google “knitting classes near me” and sign up for one. Take the first step.

Number 3 – DO SOMETHING YOU ARE BAD AT 

When it comes to creativity (and in life in general), many of us are guilty of never stepping out of our comfort zones. We stick to things we are good at because it’s no fun to suck at anything. Who likes that? No one. However, it’s the only way to eventually get to a place where you can create/make awesome stuff, you have to start with the ugly.

This is why I have been putting off learning to draw for about 15 years. I have always known deep down that I want to be able to draw, and I have started to learn so many times, but I have found so many reasons to move on to other creative practices. The only real reason I have always moved on is because I am bad at drawing. Horrible. But, I should be! I never practice. I really have never learned how. So, now I am. I have no major plans for it currently except I want to get past the point where everything I draw is crap. Not too lofty.

What about you? Make a list of some creative practices that you are bad at. Then, go back and circle the ones you want to be good at. Choose one. Now you know where to start.

Number 4 – SEE IT THROUGH

I imagine most of us start a new project or creative practice in a similar manner. We are super excited and inspired, we are going to learn everything about it, and we just can’t wait to create something! We get started with it, work on it for a few days (maybe even a few weeks), but then something happens or life just gets in the way and we don’t think about it again for months.

Then we get a new idea for a project or creative practice and the process starts again. We seem to be stuck in a cycle of excitement and inspiration, followed by a little bit of work, and then nothing. So how do we do it? How do we push past the part when it first gets tough?

Unfortunately there is no life hack for this one. Your challenge this time is to simply see it through. Often we give up way too quickly. The second a project becomes a little more work than fun or it is no longer easy, we are out. Quit on something because it doesn’t interest you or inspire you, not because you are too lazy to keep working at it. (sorry for the tough talk).

Think about a creative project or practice you have quit on recently (that you are still interested in). Pick it back up and see it through. When you are finished, see where your creativity takes you next.

Number 5 – LISTEN TO THE MUSIC

Music is a creative activity that most of us participate in everyday. You don’t have to play music or write music in order to be inspired by it. Many of us do our best thinking as we listen to music and let our minds wander.

Your challenge is to do just that: listen to the music. But, this time, do it more thoughtfully. Choose a song that you have always loved but haven’t necessarily paid attention to the lyrics. Listen more closely this time. Actually think about the artist meant by the lyrics and what you want them to mean.

Try one of the following challenges:

  • Make up new lyrics to the song.
  • Or is drawing more your thing? Listen to the lyrics and illustrate them.

All right, if you haven’t downloaded the workbook for these 5 ideas, you can do that here. Then get going! Start creating. As I mentioned, this is just a starting point. Truthfully, these ideas might not interest you, but they are supposed to be a jumping off point for your creativity – one of the first steps to unleashing your creative beast.

p.s. If you are looking for more ways to practice your creativity, check out this post – 10 ways to Inject Creativity Into Your Daily Life.

p.p.s. I stole the phrase “unleash your creative beast” from my cousin Jim. He’s the best.

 

Clean Slate Creativity is a 4 week, step-by-step guide to help you wipe your creative slate clean and start fresh. Up in Week 4 is figuring out what's next. Let’s get to it!

Clean Slate Creativity: What’s Next

Clean Slate Creativity is a 4 week, step-by-step guide to help you wipe your creative slate clean and start fresh. Up in Week 4 is figuring out next steps. Let’s get to it!

Clean Slate Creativity is a 4 week, step-by-step guide to help you wipe your creative slate clean and start fresh. Up in Week 4 is figuring out what's next. Let’s get to it!

Here’s the story. (In case you missed it, here’s week 1week 2, and week 3).

For the final week of Clean Slate Creativity, you are going to figure out your next steps using what you have learned about you + your creativity so far.

Truthfully, you already have your answer(s) for what is next for you and your creativity. Remember you are starting fresh with your creativity. So if you decided that you want to learn how to quilt, or draw, or figure skate, or use power tools – it doesn’t matter. You are a beginner and that is awesome. You most likely (unless you are a freak of nature) you are going to be bad at first – you are supposed to be. Embrace this time as a beginner. Think back to if you were 7 + 8, you sucked at drawing then but you did it anyway. You have to suck for awhile, it’s all part of the process.

Okay, so step 1 is to embrace the suck. Well, not really.

Step 1 is to look back at weeks 2 + 3 (mostly 3) and make a statement about where you want to go with your creativity next.

Fill in the blank: I want to ___________________________. Great. Now how are you going to do that?

How are you going to learn to sew? How are you going to draw? How are you going to learn to play the guitar? To take photos? To design a website?

Step 2: Gather Resources + Materials/Tools

Now that you know what you what to practice, it’s time to figure out the how.

If you are starting a new creative practice, most likely you are going to have to learn something new. Even if you are an expert knitter, but you haven’t picked up yarn and needles for the past ten years, you likely are going to need a little help brushing up your skills. Or the opposite end of the spectrum, maybe you are a complete novice and are looking to try something new – to flex your creative muscles a bit more. Either way, decide how you are going to learn: visit your local knit shop and sign up for a course, watch some Youtube videos, set-up a date with your neighbor who knits – whatever it is, make a decision about HOW you will learn.

**It’s also important to note here that you know yourself best and know what kind of learner you are. If you do not do well, or follow through, when you say you are going to learn on your own. Then don’t do it that way. Think about how you actually like to learn and how you are successful and make a plan based on that.

In addition, mostly likely you will need tools or materials of some kind. Figure out what they are (Google it, ask someone, etc.) and get them. Remember, when starting a new creative venture, it is not necessary to have every fancy tool. Just start with the basics. If you find that you enjoy this venture, you can always upgrade later. You don’t want to jump in credit card first into a new project without testing the waters first. That’s how you end up with a craft room, garage, basement, whatever full of creative projects you have started, but not followed through on. Keep it simple. You can always scale up if you enjoy it.

Number 3: Make a Plan

It’s awesome that you are starting a new creative venture, but when are you going to work on it? Just buying the tools and materials is not going to get you anywhere – except with a craft room full on projects you are “going to get to someday.”

It’s time to take action! Start living it! If you are realistically going to make a change in your life, you need to take an honest look at your days and see where you can make changes. Everyone is busy. I get it. But how busy are you with things that actually matter to you? What I mean, most likely you aren’t going to quit your job or starting ignoring your friends or kids, so where will you get the time to practice your creativity? You need to make room so you can live what you love.

What are some areas of your life you will need to minimize in order to devote quality time to your creative path? TV? Social media? What are you willing to give up – or at least cut back on? Think about when you say you are going to just watch tv for a half hour, or just look at Facebook for five minutes, how long does it really end up turning into? Is it possible that you could take some of that time and work on your creative spark for 30 minutes per day?

What areas of your life will you need to maximize in order to devote quality time to your creative path? Where can you find pockets of wasted time throughout your day? Do you have to wait while your kids are at a lesson or practice? Do you waste fifteen minutes waiting for someone to show up to a meeting or for an appointment? If you plan ahead each day, you can better utilize some of your normally wasted time.

How often can you realistically work on this new practice? Daily? Weekly? Monthly? Be honest with yourself; be realistic with your time and your ability. As you are learning something new, everything is going to take longer than it will down the road. Add it to your calendar – be specific on your calendar. What time of day are you going to work on it and for how long. If you know it is going to be a stretch or even impossible for you to do it every single day, then don’t put that on your plan. Set yourself up for success, not failure.

Number 4: Start

Get started. Learn it. Make it. Create it. Design it. Build it. Whatever you are planning, do it. Start.

**One tip, tell people about it. It’s a good way to hold yourself accountable

Number 5: Reflect

After you have tried out your new creative venture, it is vital that you stop and reflect.

Are you enjoying yourself? Do you want to learn more/increase your skills? Is there a better way to spend your free time?

If you are enjoying yourself and happy, keep going with it! If you are not, do not be afraid to quit and try something new.

Remember, it’s going to be ugly at first.

Well that’s it folks. You made it through all 4 weeks of Clean Slate Creativity. If you need any help along the way, please email me at greensandbluesco AT gmail.com.

**If you are interested in joining the Clean Slate Creativity Facebook group, you can click here. It’s a great place for reminders to practice your creativity, inspiration + motivation.

Clean Slate Creativity is a 4 week, step-by-step guide to help you wipe your creative slate clean and start fresh. Up in Week 4 is figuring out next steps. Let’s get to it!

 

Clean Slate Creativity is a 4 week, step-by-step guide to help you wipe your creative slate clean and start fresh. Up in Week 3 is analyzing your responses. Let’s get to it!

Clean Slate Creativity: Your Responses

Clean Slate Creativity is a 4 week, step-by-step guide to help you wipe your creative slate clean and start fresh. Up in Week 3 is analyzing your responses. Let’s get to it!

Clean Slate Creativity is a 4 week, step-by-step guide to help you wipe your creative slate clean and start fresh. Up in Week 3 is analyzing your responses. Let’s get to it!

Here’s the story. (In case you missed it, here’s week 1 and week 2).

Welcome back to the Clean Slate Creativity Series. 

To recap, so far you have wiped the slate clean + started fresh with your creativity. Last week, I had you try 4 different exercises in order to look at your creativity with fresh eyes. Pull out those worksheets again.

Now, take a step back. Let’s play pretend for a minute here. Make up a fake person. My fake person is going to be Meghan. Meghan is struggling to figure out how she is creative and and asked for my help. So, if Meghan gave me these worksheets, what feedback would I give her?

It seems like a silly way of going about this, but for most of us, we are much nicer to other people than we are to ourselves. I’m sure (hopefully) that you would never give fake Meghan the feedback of, “you are horrible at drawing.” Or, “this doesn’t make any sense.” No. You would take the time to analyze and reflect on what Meghan said and what she didn’t say. Then you would provide her with some constructive feedback.

Let’s take a closer look at each exercise and you can determine what specific feedback you would give to your fake person.

Exercise #1

Look at your page for this exercise. To be perfectly honest, this one may or may not help. It is so open ended that it might not be related in anyway. Let’s take a look at Meghan’s (my) response to Exercise #1:

Screen Shot 2017-07-18 at 1.40.20 PM

Using the information from Meghan’s response, it would be simple to give her feedback: she has a number of creative practices she seems interested in. It’s not clear whether these are creative practices she already does or practices she is interested in learning more about + getting started with.

*When I wrote these responses I had creativity/creative practices on my mind, so my response is rather on point whereas your’s might have been on something completely different – like your grocery list. So no worries if you didn’t get a lot of great information from this first exercise. The other 3 will help!

Exercises #2 – 4

Read through your fake person’s response for each of these exercises. Do you see any patterns forming? Take a look at fake Meghan’s (my) responses for these exercises:

 

My feedback to Meghan is that she doesn’t seem to be lacking ideas for how to practice her creativity. That’s awesome. However, if she tries to focus on all of these at once, she will probably get overwhelmed and end up not doing any of it. Instead, she should write all of these ideas down on a list. Then go through the list and determine which one she is actually interested in learning + practicing now.

This is the point to actually think about time, cost, skills required, etc. Narrow the list down to one and that is where she should start practicing her creativity. But, she should hang that list somewhere she will see it often. That way, if she starts weaving but soon decides it’s not really for her, instead of starting this process over she can jump right into another creative practice!

Hopefully once you have provided yourself/your fake person with some feedback you will have an idea of how you WANT to practice your creativity. If you feel like you are stuck and can’t figure it out, there are two things you can try.

Number 1

Ask someone you trust to take a look the responses to the exercises and give you feedback.

Number 2

Email me your worksheets (greensandbluesco AT gmail.com) and I will give you my feedback!

One week left in our Clean Slate Creativity series. Next week, you put your creativity into practice! See you then.

Clean Slate Creativity is a 4 week, step-by-step guide to help you wipe your creative slate clean and start fresh. Up in Week 3 is analyzing your responses. Let’s get to it!

 

Clean Slate Creativity is a 4 week, step-by-step guide to help you wipe your creative slate clean and start fresh. Up in Week 2 is starting fresh. Let’s get to it!

Clean Slate Creativity: Start Fresh

Clean Slate Creativity is a 4 week, step-by-step guide to help you wipe your creative slate clean and start fresh. Up in Week 2 is starting fresh. Let’s get to it!

Clean Slate Creativity is a 4 week, step-by-step guide to help you wipe your creative slate clean and start fresh. Up in Week 2 is starting fresh. Let’s get to it!

Here’s the story. (If you missed Week 1, you can find it here).

Now that you have wiped your creative slate clean, you are ready to start fresh.

How does a kid approach creativity?

Imagine if you entered a room with paper and a basket of markers on the table. If you were a kid, mostly likely you would simply uncap a marker and dive in. As an adult, more likely you might preface it with something like, “well I am not good at drawing, but…” or “I am a horrible artist.”

It’s like we expect everyone to judge every mark we make (I guess we get that from years in school). Anyway, clean slate creativity is about starting over.

Today, I’m not going to waste time convincing you that you are in fact creative. Since you wiped your creative slate clean, you are basically going back to childhood when everyone knows that they are creative. Instead, I’m going to prove to you that you are creative. I hope you’ll join me in completing a few simple exercises. Download your worksheets here if you haven’t already done so.

Get those worksheets filled out!

This is where we stop for week 2. I promised it wouldn’t be too much work at once:) Hold onto these worksheets for next week. You are going to analyze your response to each exercise. See you next week!

Clean Slate Creativity is a 4 week, step-by-step guide to help you wipe your creative slate clean and start fresh. Up in Week 2 is starting fresh. Let’s get to it!

Clean Slate Creativity is a 4 week, step-by-step guide to help you wipe your creative slate clean and start fresh. Up first in Week 1 is wiping that slate clean. Let's get to it!

Clean Slate Creativity: Wipe the Slate Clean

Clean Slate Creativity is a 4 week, step-by-step guide to help you wipe your creative slate clean and start fresh. Up first in Week 1 is wiping that slate clean. Let’s get to it!

Clean Slate Creativity is a 4 week, step-by-step guide to help you wipe your creative slate clean and start fresh. Up first in Week 1 is wiping the slate clean. Let's get to it!

Here’s the story.

I often advocate that you can figure out how you are creative now (and how you want to be creative now) by taking a look at your creative past. However, for some people that doesn’t work out because they get too hung up on their creative shortcomings in the past.

If you are a part of our Facebook group (you can click here to join) you may have noticed a few months back, I changed the name of our group. It is now – Clean Slate Creativity! The name change came from the idea: what if you could start over with your creative life? Go back to whenever it was when you were younger when you went down one path creatively. At that time most of us were not aware that we were making decisions that could affect the rest of our lives!

Now, as adults, we deserve to start fresh with our creativity and not get hung up on anything from the past (I’m not creative, I can’t draw, I never took any art classes, yada yada yada). 

Today we are wiping the slate clean and starting fresh!

If I asked you to reflect on your creative past – when you were still a kid, most people would have the similar reflections:

I was creative and I practiced it in a variety of way – drawing, coloring, imaginary play, singing, etc.

If I asked you to reflect on your creative past from somewhere around the ages of 10 – 16 – this would be the point where everyone’s stories would diverge down different paths. Yet, many of your stories (and mine) could fall into 1 of 3 categories.

  1. You were creative and you practiced your creativity in a variety of ways until someone made you and your creativity feel less than. Since then you have been hesitant to practice your creativity + even more shy about sharing it.
  2. You were creative and everyone knew it. Your creativity was on display 24/7 in your activities, the way you acted, and what you wore.
  3. You were creative when you were younger but now you just simply choose to spend time on other interests – friends, sports, school, etc.

Back to the present –  think about where you are today with your creativity.

  • Do you know you are creative and practice your creativity regularly?
  • Do you know you could be creative, but aren’t sure where/how to start?
  • Do you have so many creative activities that you don’t know where or how to focus your attention?
  • Do you think you aren’t creative?

It doesn’t matter which option you chose. It’s time to wipe the slate clean. We are going to get rid of your creative past + start fresh.  Let go all your past creative experiences  – GOOD + BAD! We are starting anew.

When we pick up again next week, each of you will start with a clean slate when it comes to your creativity. See you then!

Clean Slate Creativity is a 4 week, step-by-step guide to help you wipe your creative slate clean and start fresh. Up first in Week 1 is wiping the slate clean. Let's get to it!

The next step in identifying your personal brand of creativity is to determine how you are currently creative.

Where You Are + Where You Want to Be

The next step in identifying your personal brand of creativity is to determine how you are currently creative. 

The next step in identifying your personal brand of creativity is to determine how you are currently creative.

Here’s the story. 

Today, we continue the process of identifying your personal brand of creativity. Last week you visualized your creativity as a child, this week we are on to figuring out how you are currently creativity. Give me a minute to explain before you go getting all “I’m not creative” on me.

I’ll be honest, last week’s activity was most likely easier for you than this one – which doesn’t really makes sense. It should be more difficult to think about your creativity long ago, but more people have a problem talking about themselves in the present as a creative person.

Do any of these sound like you?

  • You truly believe you aren’t creative.
  • You acknowledge that you are a creative person, aren’t sure how.
  • Maybe you know you are creative, but are ashamed of your creativity, because you believe it is not as “good” as other people’s creativity.
  • You know you are creative and can tell you exactly how. If this is you, stop reading and pick back up with us next week.

So if any of the first three sounds like you, let’s get to making a list.

Title your list: How I am Currently Creative.

Think about how you spend you time over the course of a week.

  • Are there any times when you are required to problem-solve? Whether it’s for your job or for your personal life, it doesn’t matter. Add it to your list.
  • Do you make anything? It could be food, sewing or knitting a hat, or even….
  • Do you generate ideas? This goes hand in hand with brainstorming, but you get the idea.
  • Do you design anything? For your job? For your home?

Check out my list below. See how I included even the most random examples (making dinner).

The next step in identifying your personal brand of creativity is to determine how you are currently creative

Now, how do you want to be creative?

Don’t consider time, money, education, or anything else. Just think about how you would practice your creativity in an ideal world. Add it to the bottom of your page?

Awesome! You are almost done gathering information, but if you want to finish identifying your personal brand of creativity, then click here to enroll in the free five day email course.

Enroll in the free five day email course: Find Your Creativity Adventure.

The next step in identifying your personal brand of creativity is to determine how you are currently creative

Tell Your Story - that is, your creative story. In order to identify your personal brand of creativity for future use, you need to know where you have been.

Tell Your Story

In order to identify your personal brand of creativity for future use, you need to know where you have been.

Tell Your Story - In order to identify your personal brand of creativity for future use, you need to know where you have been. How have your practiced your creativity throughout your life? What's your creative story?

Here’s the story:

The story of your life is made up of your experiences, your personality, + the people in your life. Your creativity plays a major role in telling your story – even if you are someone who can regularly be heard saying something similar to:

“I’m not creative.”

“I wish I was creative.”

“I’m not as creative as her.”

“I wish I could have creative ideas like her.”

Just getting past these negative thoughts is an accomplishment. So, if you are just getting started thinking of yourself as a creative person, it can be overwhelming to know where to begin.

The easiest place to start?

With your own story of course.

In trying to figure out how you are creative, a great place to start is with your past. Visualize how you have practiced creativity throughout your life – the various creative activities you have tried and time periods when you have been the most creative.

Remember, creativity shows itself in many different forms. Don’t be afraid to think outside of the box when it comes to brainstorming about your creative past.

Why are you doing this? In order to identify your personal brand of creativity for future use, you need to know where you have been. Obviously it’s your life, you were there, you experienced it. However, often, in order to make sense of everything, it is helpful to get it down on paper – it is much easier to see that way and you will find that you will remember a lot more than you originally thought.

Here’s my example:

Tell Your Story - In order to identify your personal brand of creativity for future use, you need to know where you have been. How have your practiced your creativity throughout your life? What's your creative story?

You could go about this activity in few different ways. For my example, I did a quick brainstorm that included only creative activities from when I was a little kid. It only took about five minutes and it gave me the opportunity to step back into time and think about how I was creative when I was younger. I too am one of those people that a few years ago would have been caught saying something like, “I’m not creative.”

These examples of my creative past came so easy to me that I decided to go all in on this activity and tell the story of my entire creative life – as a child to the (almost) present. See my example below:

Tell Your Story - In order to identify your personal brand of creativity for future use, you need to know where you have been. How have your practiced your creativity throughout your life? What's your creative story?Tell Your Story - In order to identify your personal brand of creativity for future use, you need to know where you have been. How have your practiced your creativity throughout your life? What's your creative story?

 

Whichever way you decide to complete this activity is fine, but give it a try. Next week, you will move on to figuring out how you are CURRENTLY creative – even if you don’t think you are!

Tell Your Story - that is, your creative story. In order to identify your personal brand of creativity for future use, you need to know where you have been.

 

Inspiration + tutorials are great, but your creativity can’t be wrapped up in someone else's creativity. It’s time for you to get out from the masses of inspiration + ideas your creativity is buried under and identify how you are creative.

Social Media is Stifling Your Creativity

It’s time for you to get out from the masses of inspiration + ideas your creativity is buried under and identify how you are creative.

Inspiration + tutorials are great, but your creativity can’t be wrapped up in someone else's creativity. It’s time for you to get out from the masses of inspiration + ideas your creativity is buried under and identify how you are creative.

 

Here’s the story.

I love craft blogs. LOVE THEM. Obsessed with them. But, they can also be my creative downfall. I went through a period of a year (give or take a couple of months) where I read/skimmed through about 15 – 20 of them daily. Everyone was DIY’ing or crafting such cool shit and I planned on making it all. I also was so in love with craft blogs that I wanted to start one of my own. I have no good reason for why I didn’t except that deep down I probably knew it wasn’t exactly right for me.

So despite the fact that I love love craft/DIY blogs dearly, why do I think they are also holding many people back?

For awhile, I made myself stop reading DIY/craft blogs all together. I even unfollowed most of them on social media. I stopped reading them because every single day I would discover some new amazing project that someone share and that I just “had” to make. I would plan on making it, but before I could ever get around to executing, I would discover some other project that was absolutely amazing and I just “had” to make. This cycle would continue and although I was constantly inspired, I never actually made anything and therefore wasn’t practicing my creativity at all.

The problem is not with the blogs, Pinterest, or even social media in general, but with how audiences react to them. There are so many craft, DIY, and lifestyle blogs out there that are ridiculously gorgeous. They are so pretty to look at, and even better, they share such creative ideas that we can constantly turn to for inspiration. And the best part, they often include detailed tutorials so that we can copy them!

Don’t get me wrong, I’m not ragging on these, because I love them. I also love Pinterest and love Instagram. Daily, I am inspired by something I see/read on one of these outlets. But, other people’s ideas and tutorials can’t be the sole focus of YOUR CREATIVITY. If it is, you really don’t know yourself as a creative person.

The problem lies in people pinning every tutorial or project they see on Pinterest, but never actually making any of it. Making all kinds of plans, but not executing anything. Or, ONLY copying the work. Making stuff you see online is great (recipes, decorating your house, holiday cards, etc.), but at some point you have to learn what makes YOU creative.

Inspiration + tutorials are awesome, but your creativity can’t be wrapped up in someone else’s creativity.

It’s time for you to get out from the masses of inspiration + ideas your creativity is buried under and identify how you are creative.

To summarize, don’t quit going on Pinterest or other social media and reading blogs (unless of course you want to), but take some time to learn how YOU are creative and start practicing it today.

p.s. Need some help with figuring out how you are creative? Click here for my free five day email course: Find Your Creativity Adventure.

Inspiration + tutorials are great, but your creativity can’t be wrapped up in someone else's creativity. It’s time for you to get out from the masses of inspiration + ideas your creativity is buried under and identify how you are creative.

Identify Your Personal Brand of Creativity with the help of my 5 Day Email Course - Find Your Creativity Adventure. Click to learn more + sign up now!

Identify Your Personal Brand of Creativity

Identify Your Personal Brand of Creativity with the help of my 5 Day Email Course - Find Your Creativity Adventure. Click to learn more + sign up now!The main mantra here at Greens & Blues Co. is to find your creativity and start practicing it. Sounds good, but what do you do once you have done that? What comes next? Is that the end of the story?

Welllll, kind of. Or, not really at all. More like beginning of the story.

Once you are comfortable with the idea of yourself as a creative person and are willing + excited to practice your creativity on a daily (or however often you decide) basis, it’s time to challenge yourself a little bit more.

Finding your creativity is realizing that you are in fact a creative person and figuring out how you like to practice it. This is the first step. You can then kick that idea up a notch by identifying your personal brand of creativity – where you actively seek out how creativity is unique to you.

Identifying your personal brand of creativity is different than just finding a creative activity you like, such as knitting. Millions of people love to knit, what makes you different?

Finding your personal brand of creativity is all about YOU – it is not about the creative act.  You might love to knit, but you are more than just a knitter.

  • Is it what you knit?
  • The materials you use to knit?
  • Do you follow a pattern or design your own knits?
  • Do you knit for yourself and loved ones, or do you knit to sell?

One of the ideas above could be the thing that sets you apart from all other knitters. More likely though your personal creative brand is made up of several components.

Let’s say that you do knit. Great, but likely knitting isn’t the only way you practice your creativity. To Identify your personal brand of creativity, you need to reflect on and investigate all of the ways you are creative. Once you have done that you will start to look for patterns and make sense of it. Easy peasy, right? (If you are thinking hell no, just hold on, I have something to help you.)

An example might help:

My personal brand of creativity?

It is the intersection of creativity and teaching & learning.

How did I figure out my personal brand of creativity?

I would say that it started with me reading a Whole New Mind by Daniel Pink and took another big leap when I launched Greens & Blues Co. In between those two events (about 6 years give or take), I did a lot of reflection, trial + error, learning, and investigating other people’s creativity.

I enjoy many different creative outlets: knitting, sewing, hand-lettering, scrapbooking, visual thinking, and various other creative activities on a regular basis.

While I enjoy the creative activities I listed above, it took some practice + reflection for me to realize that the part of my creativity that I am the most passionate about is the point where creativity and learning intersect. I am passionate about creativity and teaching + learning, so put them together and what do you get? Teaching about creativity and learning. Ta-da!

What’s the easiest way I can help you identify your personal brand of creativity?

Sign up for my free 5 day email course. It’s good stuff – the Find Your Creativity Adventure. If you complete the activities, you will be able to identify your own personal brand of creativity by the end of the five days.

Find Your Creativity Adventure Visual Thinking: Identifying your own personal brand of creativity is just like planning an adventure. Find out how by clicking to enroll in my free 5 day email course.

 

Who Does Your Creativity Serve? You need to be at least a little selfish with your creativity.

Who Does Your Creativity Serve?

Who Does Your Creativity Serve? You need to be at least a little selfish with your creativity.

A few weeks ago, we talked about how creativity was more than just arts + crafts. In doing so, you came up with a variety of ways that you are creative throughout your day that have nothing to do with arts + crafts. However, my guess is that if you went back to your list, you would notice that most of your creativity was used in service of other people.

It’s great that you can use your creativity to solve problems for others, to entertain your kids, or to make something awesome at work, but don’t forget, your creativity should also serve you.

How are you creative that is just for you?

Not sure? That’s okay. Keep reading for 4 ways to get started on your personal creative path.

Sometimes it can be difficult to get started on the path to finding your creativity. One option would be to just jump head first into something. If it works, great. If not, try something else. If that’s not your style, option two would be to take a more practical, practiced approach. Try one of the ideas below to get started thinking about your own creativity.

Who Does Your Creativity Serve? You need to be at least a little selfish with your creativity. Here are 4 ways to get you started on your creative path

Number 1

Go for a walk by yourself + let your mind wander. If you come up with any ideas, use the voice memo app on your phone to record yourself talking it out.

Number 2

Set a timer for 30 minutes and “wander” around Pinterest. Find a project you want to try, and make a list of everything you need to start it.

Number 3

Browse through Netflix/Amazon Prime/Hulu until you find a documentary about someone doing something they are passionate about. Watch it.

Number 4

Get a blank notebook and pen or pencil. Set a timer and start writing, drawing, or some combination of the two. Stop when the timer goes off.

Are any of these going to change your life? Probably not. Are any of them going to make you instantly into your most creative self? Definitely not. However, they are all priming you to start thinking of yourself as a creative person. In addition they are all great exercises to allow you to unleash your creativity and find out where you could take yourself if you gave yourself time to stop and reflect. Finally, they are all easy to do and it’s completely reasonable to choose one to start practicing on a daily basis.

The truth is no matter who your creativity serves – you or someone else – you benefit from the process. Even so, you should still be at least a little selfish with your creativity. 🙂