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Practice Your Creativity - It doesn't have to be complicated, you just need to start! Click over to greens + blues co. for more ideas on practicing your creativity.

Practice Your Creativity

Sometimes such a simple idea can become way to complicated. Practicing your creativity is one these. What’s one easy way you can practice your creativity today?

Practice Your Creativity - It doesn't have to be complicated, you just need to start! Click over to greens + blues co. for more ideas on practicing your creativity.

Here’s the story.

Sometimes the biggest roadblock to getting started practicing your creativity is just deciding what to do. If this is something you struggle with – check out this graphic for ideas for practicing your creativity.

Practice Your Creativity - It doesn't have to be complicated, you just need to start! Click over to greens + blues co. for more ideas on practicing your creativity.

Sidenote – these are what came to my mind when I thought about practicing creativity – this is by no means an exhaustive list. You can, of course, practice your creativity in whatever format you want. Creativity is simply turning ideas into reality. So dream up an idea and start turning it into reality!

Practice your creativity. It doesn’t have to be complicated. For the past year or two I have written a post almost every single week (or every other week) about creativity. Most of them can be boiled down to the idea that you can practice your creativity any way you want. I made the above graphic for a couple of reasons.

  1. To share ways that anyone can get started (or continue) practicing their creativity. These aren’t mind-blowing but simple things that anyone can do.
  2. To demonstrate that there are a variety of ways to practice your creativity and there is definitely no right or wrong way to do it (the only wrong way is to not practice your creativity at all). You can practice your creativity in easy ways that are familiar to you (for me this could be writing) or you can try new creative practices that are uncomfortable because you are just getting started (definitely drawing for me).
  3. To challenge myself. I have shared that I’m determined to learn how to draw (or just not to be awful at it). One way that I keep challenging myself is to say that I’m going to create graphics like this to share. Basically I force myself to do it.

So let’s uncomplicate the whole process. What’s one easy thing you can do to practice your creativity today?

Practice Your Creativity - It doesn't have to be complicated, you just need to start! Click over to greens + blues co. for more ideas on practicing your creativity.

 

The part of the creative process many of us are guilty of rushing through? The brainstorming process. It's difficult to slow down when you are inspired but crucial that you do so! Click to read more on greens + blues co. about the brainstorming process.

Don’t Rush This Part of the Brainstorming Process

The part of the creative process many of us are guilty of rushing through? The brainstorming process. It’s difficult to slow down when you are inspired but crucial that you do so!

The part of the creative process many of us are guilty of rushing through? The brainstorming process. It's difficult to slow down when you are inspired but crucial that you do so! Click to read more on greens + blues co. about the brainstorming process.

Here’s the story.

I know how it is – you have a moment of inspiration and you are so excited to start something new, so you immediately dive in. We are all guilty of this, but brainstorming is a crucial part of the creative process and it shouldn’t be rushed.

Common Problem #1 With the Brainstorming Process

Waiting to do something (starting a new painting, write, etc.) until you have an idea.

I’d love to work on my next project but I don’t have an idea so I’m just going to wait to start until I have an idea.  

I don’t want to say that you are never going to have a flash of inspiration out of nowhere, but it’s not as likely to happen as it would if you put in the work. You want to set yourself up with the opportunity to have your next great idea.

So instead of telling yourself that you will start writing once you have an idea for your next story, just start writing. It can be complete garbage – that’s fine. As you write and put in the practice, you are more likely to figure out what it is you want to write about (this is true of any creative practice).

This might not be a “traditional” way to go about the brainstorming process but it is going to work in the same way that you are setting yourself up to come up with your next idea.

Common Problem #2 With the Brainstorming Process

As soon as you have an idea – your first idea – you go all in with it. You tell yourself this is my next great idea and you go out and buy everything, you sign up for everything, you just get so pumped up. Then, a couple of days later you realize, this isn’t quite for me. Or, maybe it’s not as great of an idea as I thought. Or, I’m just not as excited about it as I thought I would be.

Then, you don’t do anything. Then, next time you have your “big idea” the same thing happens, you get stuck in a cycle of this and never really figure out what you want to do, what you want to create, what you want to make, or what you want to design. You go all in or nothing.

Improve Your Brainstorming Process

Number 1 – Practice coming up with ideas. Make a habit of coming up with a certain amount of ideas everyday. Force yourself to come up with ideas. I know what you are thinking, when I force myself to come up with ideas, I’m never going to come up with good ideas that way and yes, that is true most of the time. But, you are putting in the practice so that eventually you have will have a great idea. It’s not going to come instantaneously and super easy, it’s going to take work like everything else. So basically you are creating a habit of coming up with ideas.

As you make a habit of brainstorming ideas, determine where you are going to collect those ideas. Will it be digitally (phone or computer)? Or will it be analog (journal, back of napkin)?

After you have ideas down, how do you organize them? Go back through ideas from time to time. Even if an idea wasn’t right for you when you had it, it might be right for you later or the idea will inspire a different idea. You can also look to see if you have had the same idea more than once – if so, it means something, take note.

Number 2 – So let’s say you put into practice the habit of coming up with ideas everyday. So after one day’s brainstorm you look at your ideas and think: okay, 3 of these are terrible, one is decent, and one could be good. Instead of just being like, okay that’s it, that’s my idea – let’s dive in – try sitting on that idea for awhile. Not a year or anything like that. But, maybe for a couple of days, or even a week. Remember, you first idea is not always going to be your best idea.

If you keep coming back around to that idea, then go for it. Start to explore it more. But, if in two or three days you have already moved on, you know you have done the right thing. So, basically, this is to extend the brainstorming process beyond just one sitting or one day. You are going to vet your ideas to ensure they are really good ideas.

By being patient with your ideas, you will find that you will come up with even better ones.

The part of the creative process many of us are guilty of rushing through? The brainstorming process. It's difficult to slow down when you are inspired but crucial that you do so! Click to read more on greens + blues co. about the brainstorming process.

 

It’s time to take your well-practiced creativity and stretch it further.

Stretch Your Creativity

It’s time to take your well-practiced creativity and stretch it further.

It’s time to take your well-practiced creativity and stretch it further.

Here’s the story.

**If this is the first time you are reading something from greens + blues co., first check out this five day email course – a guide to identifying how you are creative.

By now (assuming you have been around here for awhile), you should know how you are creative. Hopefully, you have been practicing your creativity as well. Awesome!

However, even though you went through the process of identifying how you are creative, it doesn’t mean that your creativity will remain exactly the same forever. It shouldn’t! As you continue to practice it more, you will grow + change and so will your creativity. Your interests may change, or you may grow more confident in your creativity and want to try something new.

Stretch Your Creativity

It’s time to take your well-practiced creativity and stretch it further. It’s time to try something that scares you, something where you need to learn something new, where you are out of your comfort zone. I know, I know – it’s not always fun to do this. You are putting yourself in a position where you are going to suck at first. You might even fail at first. But, in the end, you will thank me for giving you this kick in the butt to challenge yourself and stretch your creativity.

There’s two (at least) easy ways to go about stretching your creativity.

Number 1

You can learn a completely new creative activity – unrelated to other creative activities you have practiced in the past.

For example, let’s say I have always considered myself a writer, then in this case I would learn a completely new practice such as dancing, drawing, or sewing.

Number 2

You can learn a new skill in a current creative practice.

For example, maybe I have been knitting for a while but have always been hesitant to try knitting socks because it will require me to learn a few new skills – then this would be the perfect time to learn those new skills!

Let’s rewind for a minute.

Ever since I launched greens + blues co. a few years ago, practicing my creativity has become a part of my daily life. As with any skill that we commit time + energy to practicing regularly, my creativity has improved – it’s grown and even changed. When I first started out on my creative adventure a few years ago, my creativity looked one way. While it still looks similar now, it has in fact changed quite a bit. In some ways it has grown into areas I never thought it would (writing and drawing) and other ways it has filtered out activities that I used to enjoy (scrapbooking).

So how did it happen?

How did I stretch my creativity from what it used to look like to what it currently looks like now?

First and foremost, I committed to practicing my creativity daily (or a close to daily as possible). There is no way around this one.

Once you have established a habit of practicing your creativity, you will realize that it is actually quite easy to stretch your creativity. Sometimes, it may happen organically and you will not even consciously realize it is happening until you have started a new creative practice or acquired a new skill. Other times, you might realize that you are growing bored or uninspired by your current creative practice, and you make the decision to try something new. Even other times, you might see a creative practice that looks awesome and you can’t wait to try it – it can be as simple as that!

Your Turn:

Brainstorm a list of new creative practices you are interested in trying. Be sure to include both completely new creative practices and new skills in a current creative practice.

Once you have your list, don’t feel like you have to immediately narrow it down to one and get started on it. You can, or you can post the list somewhere you will see it often and over time filter out what doesn’t sound quite as interesting as it once did. Or, if one creative practice sounds exciting every time you look think of it – go for it!

How Am I Stretching My Creativity?

One way I’m currently stretching my creativity is by learning how to draw and making a daily habit of it. Because I’m such a newbie at it (and so bad), often I get stuck thinking what should I draw next? Something that has been providing me with non-stop  inspiration + resources is signing up for Skillshare. Skillshare has hundreds (maybe even thousands) of classes on a variety of creative topics. There are so many classes that are quick – it’s a great place to start if you aren’t sure what you want to do. This is a great place  to test the waters. If you sign up using this link you can get two month free (full disclosure I get a free month for everyone that signs up using that link.)

Leave me a comment and tell me how you are going to stretch your creativity!

It’s time to take your well-practiced creativity and stretch it further.

Keep track of your creative practices with this free tracker. Click here to download it now.

Track Your Creativity – Free Printable

I’ll make this short + sweet. I made this tracker for myself to organize my creative practices and to help myself focus on different creative practices each month. A few people asked me to share it – so here it is. You can click here to download it. Then get started tracking your creativity.

Keep track of your creative practices with this free tracker. Click here to download it now.

For the month of September, I wanted to focus on drawing (in addition to other creative practices such as writing that I already practice daily), so I used this handy dandy tracker to set a goal for the month – create a daily habit of either drawing for 10 minutes or drawing ten things. I then brainstormed how I would learn to draw and what I actually needed to do to reach this goal. Finally, I used the calendar on the left to actually keep track of what I have worked on each day. It has been super helpful – mainly because I use it as a constant reminder of what I’m working on this month. I hope you find it helpful as well. If you use it, let me know how it works out for you. Start practicing your creativity!

Check My Creativity - download this free printable tracker for practicing your creativity.

Elin Loow + Katy McCullough will share a step-by-step guide for kicking of a new creative project this summer. Make Summer 2017 a creative one. Sign up now!

It’s Time to Make Something New

In case you missed it, on Thursday, June 22nd at 1 PM CDT / 8 PM CEST, I am co-hosting a FREE workshop with Elin Loow (you can find out more about her here) on kicking off a summer creative project. Here’s your chance to make Summer 2017 a creative one! (Even if you can’t make it to the live workshop, by signing up you will be emailed the replay).

In this Summer Creativity Kick-Off Workshop, Elin + I will help you choose, plan and get started on a creative summer project!

You will…

1. Find an exciting creative project that fits with your summer.
2. Figure out what resources you need to make it happen.
3. Make a plan that you’ll be able to stick with.
4. Kick-off your wonderfully creative summer!

**please note – by signing for to the workshop, you will be subscribed to both my and Elin’s email lists. We are both dedicated to helping you in your creative journey and will do our best to delight your inbox!
Elin Loow + Katy McCullough will share a step-by-step guide for kicking of a new creative project this summer. Make Summer 2017 a creative one. Sign up now!
Here’s the story.
Enough talking about creativity – it’s time to make some new shit.

Sorry, I lied – a little more talking first.

Exploring a new creative practice for the summer is all about expanding your horizons. You already know you’re creative. So, how about trying a new creative activity for the summer?

Another way of looking at it is – It’s time to make some new shit this summer.

Have you ever been in a spot creatively where you find something that works so you just keep doing it over and over? Makes sense, right? Why reinvent the wheel?

In college, for many (many) people’s birthdays I made this really cute card (in my opinion) out a cardstock that had a spot in the back for me to include a cd that I burned just for the recipient. I’m cringing because there are probably way too many of you reading this that are thinking – hey, I thought that was special just for me…sorry!

I thought it was pretty great because the craft supplies I was working with in my dorm room were a couple of pieces of cardstock and a few markers. Anyway, I made so many of these and they were great, but then came a time when I needed to explore my creativity a little more. I got bored making the same thing over and over – I needed to make some new shit.

My upcoming workshop (co-hosted with Elin Loow) will take you through the steps to do just that.

As I have previously mentioned, I have been writing a lot over the past year. Every single day to be exact (or pretty much, I don’t really pay attention to it anymore because it is ingrained – it’s just something that I do at this point). While I will still continue to write and practice that particular creative muscle, it’s also time for me to try something else. I’m using the summer to explore my creativity further.

I’m going to embrace my fear, make myself uncomfortable, and so something that I (currently) suck at. I’m going to paint.

There you have it, the new creative practice I am trying out for the summer will be abstract painting. Eh.

My goals are to play with color and to make something that doesn’t look like crap so that I can hang it in my house. These are not lofty goals. Don’t be afraid to set your sights a little higher. I just say this to be clear that I am not planning on selling my paintings or teaching others how to do it. I just want to make some cool, colorful stuff for my house. Much to my chagrin, I will share my work throughout the process – which makes me feel a little nauseous to put such ugliness out into the world. But, you have to start somewhere. 

I hope you’ll join in the fun and kick-off the summer with a new creative practice. Click here to sign-up for the free workshop and get all of the details.

Let’s go make some new shit.

Elin Loow + Katy McCullough will share a step-by-step guide for kicking of a new creative project this summer. Make Summer 2017 a creative one. Sign up now!

 

Kick-Off a New Creative Practice

On Thursday, June 22nd at 1 PM CDT / 8 PM CEST, I am co-hosting a FREE workshop with Elin Loow (you can find out more about her here) on kicking off a summer creative project. Here’s your chance to make Summer 2017 a creative one! (Even if you can’t make it to the live workshop, by signing up you will be emailed the replay).

In this Summer Creativity Kick-Off Workshop, Elin + I will help you choose, plan and get started on a creative summer project!

You will…

1. Find an exciting creative project that fits with your summer.
2. Figure out what resources you need to make it happen.
3. Make a plan that you’ll be able to stick with.
4. Kick-off your wonderfully creative summer!

**please note – by signing for to the workshop, you will be subscribed to both my and Elin’s email lists. We are both dedicated to helping you in your creative journey and will do our best to delight your inbox!

Elin Loow + Katy McCullough will share a step-by-step guide for kicking of a new creative project this summer. Make Summer 2017 a creative one. Sign up now!

Here’s the story.

There always seems to be more time in the summer. Whether you are a student or teacher and you actually have more time, or if you are just someone who feels inspired by more hours of daylight – this is for you.

Kick-Off a New Creative Practice This Summer

Why Start A New Creative Practice This Summer?

  1. Expand your creativity by increasing your skill-set.
  2. Make yourself uncomfortable.
  3. Focus your creativity in order to build your creative confidence.
  4. Why not?

Expand Your Creativity By Increasing Your Skillset

Here’s the deal. You don’t have to just be a painter, knitter, writer, etc. By all means you should explore various aspects of your creativity. However, it’s hard to get better at any one craft if you only return to it once every 6 months or so. So, in the Summer Creativity Kick-Off workshop, we are challenging you to choose one creative practice to focus on this summer. A creative practice that is different than your current go-to creative practice. So for example, I currently have a daily writing practice and I have for the past year or so. This is not going to be the focus for my summer creative hobby.

**One caveat this does not mean you can’t do anything else – that would be insane. It just means maybe don’t start a bunch of new creative hobbies at once. I’m going to be painting, but I’m also going to weaving and writing quite a bit as well.

For me, creativity goes hand in hand with learning.  The more skills I learn or acquire, the more creative I can be. At times, I have had flashes of inspiration, but did not necessarily possess the skills to execute my ideas. Therefore, by learning and then practicing new skills, my creativity has expanded.  I believe creativity is a skill, and like other skills, it must be practiced in order to improve.

Make Yourself Uncomfortable

I challenge you to make yourself uncomfortable. Like, really really uncomfortable. Like when you are stuck between two people having the most awkward conversation ever and you have no way out – that kind of uncomfortable.

Why make yourself uncomfortable? You will face a fear. You will force yourself to try something you had previously told yourself you could not or would not do. You most likely will learn something new about yourself, whether it is the fact that you can face your fear and still survive, or even just a new skill that you learn.

Trying something new is scary as shit, but if you ACTUALLY do it, what an amazing high. Think about how you will feel at the end if you

Focus Your Creativity In Order to Build Your Creative Confidence

How do you build your creative confidence?

Practice, Practice, practice. Whether you are just starting out or have been at it for some time, there is no way around it. You can’t be confident without putting in the time. Well, technically you can be, but nobody likes those people. The more you practice, the more confident you will become. It’s as easy as that. But, truthfully, it isn’t easy. It’s not easy to make your creativity a priority daily or weekly, but if you want to see the results, then it’s the only way.

Practice until there is nothing else you can say besides I am good enough. “My creative is good enough.” Practice until that’s the only answer left.

Why Not?

Why not start a new creative practice this summer? What else do you have going on that is better? What’s the worst that could happen? You practice your creativity? You gain confidence in a new creative practice? Sounds good to me! Sign up for the workshop using the form below.

Elin Loow + Katy McCullough will share a step-by-step guide for kicking of a new creative project this summer. Make Summer 2017 a creative one. Sign up now!

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today – Chunking a Creative Project.

Creativity in 10: Chunking a Creative Project

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today – Break Your Creative Project Into Digestible Chunks.

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today – Chunking a Creative Project.

Here’s the story. 

So all of this practicing your creativity in 10 minutes or less stuff is great, but what happens when you are feeling confident and you’re ready to stop practicing the ideas I gave you? What happens when you are ready to do your own thing?

Awesome. Go for it.

However, chances are that whatever creative project you start working on may not be as simple as the ways I have shared on practicing your creativity in only 10 minutes a day. If you jump head first into a huge project without any prior planning, it’s likely that you will not get the outcome you hoped for.

So, today, as the last (at least for awhile) in the Creativity in 10 series, I’m sharing how you can break your creative project into digestible chunks so you can still only practice for 10 minutes a day (or 20 minutes or an hour – whatever amount of time you have to work with).

As I am writing this, I just recently finished a few projects that I had been procrastinating on for awhile (knitting a scarf, sewing kitchen towels, and a large scale piece of script art). They are all cool and/or useful projects so I am not sure why I was procrastinating so much other than the fact that I was in the middle of so many projects at once and instead of breaking them down and finishing each bit by bit, I felt overwhelmed and did nothing. Which is absolutely ridiculous because these are creative projects we are talking about – not serious life issues. However, I would bet than many people have done something similar.

My next big creative undertaking is learning to weave – specifically to learn how to create woven hall hangings. I have been drooling over wall weavings for about a year. I keep telling myself that I am going to start, but I didn’t want to start until I finished my other projects. Now that I finished those, I’m ready to go.

Learning a new craft and completing the first project to go with it can be a big undertaking (but also fun!). I am going to break it down step by step so that I can actually accomplish something each day.  

Number 1 – Inspiration

Decide what you want to do. This might take awhile and it’s okay to look through inspiration for awhile if you have a goal. Just looking at an endless rotation of inspiration will not serve you in the end. If you are trying to figure out what to make, go for it. I started seeing wall weavings pop up on Pinterest and Instagram and I absolutely love the colors and fibers used. Then, when I started to see tutorials and DIY’s for making your own loom a lot, I made a Pinterest board called Learning to Weave so that I had a place to store all of these great ideas and inspiration.

Number 2 – Gathering Materials

Since this is a brand new creative venture for me, I had to do a little research to figure out what materials were absolutely necessary for a beginner. With any creative endeavor, of course you can buy ALL of the stuff, but there is really no need, especially at the beginning when you are not even sure if you are going to like it. So rather than just diving in credit card first, I figured out what materials I absolutely needed to start. In this case, a loom and yarn would suffice to start.

Number 3 – Gather Learning Materials

If this was a project that didn’t require you to learn anything new – then you could skip this step. But for, me I’m a complete newbie when it comes to weaving, so I got a book from my library and went back to my Learning to Weave Pinterest board so that I could find a few tutorials that I pinned.

Number 4 – Actually Learn

This step will be different for everyone depending on how much you need to learn (e.g. learning how to weave vs. learning one weaving technique). Either way it’s your best bet to chunk your learning. So for me, that might look something like this:

Day 1: learn how to warp my loom

Day 2: learn a weaving technique

Day 3: learn another weaving technique

Day 4: learn one more weaving technique

By only committing to learning a little bit each day, I won’t get overwhelmed and give up after a few days or a week.

Number 5 – Decide on a Project

Once starting a project, it’s easy to go all out at first and then lose steam and not pick it up again for months. Instead, if you plan on only doing a little bit each day (or however often you practice your creativity), you won’t feel overwhelmed or “behind” where you had planned on being. So for me, that might look something like this:

Day 1: Warp my loom

Day 2: Complete 3 rows

Day 3: Complete 4 rows (as I practice more, I assume I will become more efficient)

Day 4: Complete 5 rows

Your Turn. Take a few minutes and decide what your next creative project will be. Then start planning how to break it down into manageable chunks. I can’t wait to see what you create!

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today – Chunking a Creative Project.

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today – Practice Visual Thinking

Creativity in 10: Practice Visual Thinking

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today – Practicing Visual Thinking.

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today – Practice Visual Thinking

Here’s the story.

When it comes to visual thinking, many people immediately get hung up on the idea that it is drawing – it’s not. Well…it might be a tiny bit, but the emphasis is on communicating your ideas, not drawing. You might just have to draw some very basic creations in order to communicate your ideas.

Trust me, I wouldn’t use visual thinking so much if the emphasis was on drawing.

What is Visual Thinking Anyway?

Visual thinking is using pictures (visuals) to process what you are thinking/learning and to communicate that information.  — there are a lot more complicated definitions of visual thinking out there, but I like this one because it gets straight to the point.

You use visuals to communicate ideas.

Why Use Visual Thinking?

It can benefit both you and others.

Number 1

If you are taking notes from a book or a speech, when you practice visual thinking you are not simply copying down word for word what the author or speaker says, rather you are interpreting their words into your own visuals. As a result, you are more likely to remember and understand the information because you are actively engaging with it rather than just passively copying it down.

Number 2

If you are trying to communicate an idea with someone else, sometimes words are not enough.  Visuals can provide more clarity to what you are trying to share than just words can. Visuals + words = even better.  (As a middle school teacher, I see this notion proven on a daily basis.)

Visual thinking can be used :

  • to brainstorm ideas
  • to communicate your ideas
  • to problem solve
  • to tell a story
  • For a coach to demonstrate how a play would work
  • To take notes
  • To learn

Visual thinking is awesome because anyone can do it; you most definitely do not need to be an artist. Anything can be made clearer with a picture – this is why we look at maps, why we have illustrated how to directions, etc. Visual thinking applies to everything.

What do we do when we are trying to explain something when words don’t seem to be working? We draw it.

Getting Started With Visual Thinking

3 Steps to visual thinking:

  1. Identify
  2. Imagine
  3. Illustrate

Identify – identify your problem or what you want to do. For example: I want to figure out how to make this table. Or, I want to create an Elmo-themed party for a 2 year old.

Imagine – Imagine the possibilities, generate ideas, and brainstorm solutions.

Illustrate – Put pencil to paper, stylus to tablet, marker to – you get the idea. Just start.

So what if you think you can’t draw. I know you can do this. Visual thinking is not about drawing intricate works of art, it is about expressing your ideas in a way that is easier to communicate with others. If you want to sketch something and you don’t know how, Google “__________________ (insert whatever it is you want to draw here) icon.” After hitting enter, click on Images. You will get something that is much easier to sketch and that anyone can replicate. I do this weekly, maybe even daily :). You just have to start somewhere – even if that somewhere is not very good.

Then, you make it better.

Here’s a couple of ideas for getting started with visual thinking in less than 10 minutes. Choose any of these ideas, identify your problem, imagine it, and then start illustrating it.

Ideas for getting started. Choose one.

    • Recipe
    • A Ted Talk – there are many let are less than 6 minutes
    • Your To-Do list
    • An episode of your favorite podcast
    • Episode of a tv show
    • Sportcenter’s Top Ten List
    • Your Own Top Ten List
    • Places You Want to Travel
    • Your Grocery List
    • A Trip You Have Previously Taken

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today – Practice Visual Thinking

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today – Start A Drawing Habit.

Creativity in 10: Start a Drawing Habit

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today – Start A Drawing Habit.

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today – Start A Drawing Habit.

Here’s the story.

For many of you, the immediate reaction to seeing this headline is “hell no, I can’t draw.” I’m right there with you. If you have been around here for any amount of time, or are currently following me on Instagram you will have seen my little drawings (I usually refer to them as visual thinking).

To put it nicely they are rough. I can say with absolute certainty that when it comes to drawing – I am the worst 🙂  So I decided that if I was going to share the idea of starting a drawing habit as a simple and quick way to practice your creativity, I needed to put my money where my mouth is and try it too.

So I did it. I set a timer for ten minutes and started drawing. I decided to use a pen so that I couldn’t second guess myself and try to make everything perfect. At first, I was just going to try and cover the page in different drawings, but after drawing the same flower and circle design I have been doodling since 5th grade, I decided to start over. I got a new piece of paper and just starting drawing the door in front of my desk. It was mostly straight lines so it couldn’t be too bad, right?

I worked on it for about ten minutes. I was very happy when the 10 minutes was up. Although, if I am being truthful, I was looking forward to trying it again. Drawing made me stretch my creative muscles in a way that I haven’t tried in awhile. Like I said, I’m the worst at drawing. Give me a craft like sewing or knitting any day. But, combining my lack of skill and practice with my desire to always continue to learn – a part of me definitely wants to work on my drawing more.

I don’t know what I was expecting, there is no way it was going to look good – I haven’t practiced drawing in forever. But, it was a little freeing to try something I know I’m going to be bad at and just do it anyway.

Enough about me. Your turn.

Like all of the other exercises in the Creativity in 10 series (photo, writing, ideas), starting a drawing habit is quick and simple. You only need a pen/pencil and paper. Once again, you have several options.

  • Set a timer and go for a certain amount of time.
  • Or get a piece of paper and draw until you have covered the paper entirely.
  • You can attempt to draw something you see, or just whatever you can see in your imagination.
  • Start by drawing lines and shapes. See where it takes you.

Give it a try – you won’t regret it!

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today – Start A Drawing Habit.

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today – Creating a Photography Practice.

Creativity in 10: Create a Photography Practice

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today – Creating a Photography Practice.

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today – Creating a Photography Practice.

Here’s the story.

With Creativity in 10, we are once again exploring possibilities for practicing your creativity in 10 minutes or less each day. This is not to say that these ideas (photography, an ideas journal, a writing habit) will be the only way you will ever practice your creativity. Rather, they are ideas for helping you get back into the practice of practicing your creativity. Then, once you are feeling more confident, you can explore your own creative path.

Why Create a Photography Practice?

First, I should point out that when I say “photography” is sounds all haughty and what I really mean is: you are going to take some pictures on your phone.

Okay, back to the “why.”

Many of us already love taking photos – love documenting awesome experiences we have and love recording histories of our loved ones. So we already do it. Now we are just going to put a little thought behind it and exercise those creative muscles some more.

By creating a photography practice you will become more confident in your skills in order to feel more comfortable sharing your photographs. You will also practice the art of storytelling with the photographs you take.

And it’s easy. Many people carry their smartphones around with them anyway – you don’t need any other equipment.

And most importantly, it’s fun.

How To Create a Photography Practice

This doesn’t need to be difficult. If you are on Instagram, as you scroll through your feed, notice the subjects of interest for various people. For example, my sister Becky only takes photos of beautiful places. There may or may not be people in there as well, but they are secondary to the landscape.

Many people have a singular focus such as this. Think about the people you follow on Instagram? Do they only post photos of hand-lettering, pottery, or woven wall hangings?

Or, there are the people who take + share photos of their daily life, or just whatever captures their interest in that moment. Their Instagram feeds are more diverse, yet still serving a single purpose.

Now think about how you take photos, or how you want to take photos? Remember your answer to that question as we get into the next part of this.

There are two ways to create a photography habit (of course there are more ways, but I can only think of two – if you can think of one, you do it another way):

Number 1

Choose a theme. Possible theme ideas:

  • Kids
  • Pets
  • Nature
  • Patterns
  • Black + White

Capture as many photographs as possible that fit into your theme. Aim for at least 20+ for the week or set a daily goal for yourself.

Number 2

Take a photo at the same time everyday for a set amount of time (a week, a month, etc.). Take a photograph each day this week at the same time. Before you get started, there are a few factors to take into consideration.

  • What time of day will you take your photographs? Choose a time that is convenient for you and that you will realistically be able to take photos all week at that same time.
  • Will you photograph the same thing everyday or whatever you see at that time each day? For example, will I photograph my dog on our walk each night, or will I photograph something new I see each night when I am out walking my dog? How many to take? Will you take just 1 photograph and live with it? Or, will you shoot a bunch and choose the best?

Set an alarm or reminder on your phone so you don’t forget to take those photos!

You will notice that as you start to take more photos, your photography will improve. You will start thinking about the light, the background, etc. even if you really do not know anything about these. By trial and error (practice) you will improve your creativity.

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today – Creating a Photography Practice.