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Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today – Start A Drawing Habit.

Creativity in 10: Start a Drawing Habit

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today – Start A Drawing Habit.

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today – Start A Drawing Habit.

Here’s the story.

For many of you, the immediate reaction to seeing this headline is “hell no, I can’t draw.” I’m right there with you. If you have been around here for any amount of time, or are currently following me on Instagram you will have seen my little drawings (I usually refer to them as visual thinking).

To put it nicely they are rough. I can say with absolute certainty that when it comes to drawing – I am the worst 🙂  So I decided that if I was going to share the idea of starting a drawing habit as a simple and quick way to practice your creativity, I needed to put my money where my mouth is and try it too.

So I did it. I set a timer for ten minutes and started drawing. I decided to use a pen so that I couldn’t second guess myself and try to make everything perfect. At first, I was just going to try and cover the page in different drawings, but after drawing the same flower and circle design I have been doodling since 5th grade, I decided to start over. I got a new piece of paper and just starting drawing the door in front of my desk. It was mostly straight lines so it couldn’t be too bad, right?

I worked on it for about ten minutes. I was very happy when the 10 minutes was up. Although, if I am being truthful, I was looking forward to trying it again. Drawing made me stretch my creative muscles in a way that I haven’t tried in awhile. Like I said, I’m the worst at drawing. Give me a craft like sewing or knitting any day. But, combining my lack of skill and practice with my desire to always continue to learn – a part of me definitely wants to work on my drawing more.

I don’t know what I was expecting, there is no way it was going to look good – I haven’t practiced drawing in forever. But, it was a little freeing to try something I know I’m going to be bad at and just do it anyway.

Enough about me. Your turn.

Like all of the other exercises in the Creativity in 10 series (photo, writing, ideas), starting a drawing habit is quick and simple. You only need a pen/pencil and paper. Once again, you have several options.

  • Set a timer and go for a certain amount of time.
  • Or get a piece of paper and draw until you have covered the paper entirely.
  • You can attempt to draw something you see, or just whatever you can see in your imagination.
  • Start by drawing lines and shapes. See where it takes you.

Give it a try – you won’t regret it!

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today – Start A Drawing Habit.

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today – Creating a Photography Practice.

Creativity in 10: Create a Photography Practice

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today – Creating a Photography Practice.

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today – Creating a Photography Practice.

Here’s the story.

With Creativity in 10, we are once again exploring possibilities for practicing your creativity in 10 minutes or less each day. This is not to say that these ideas (photography, an ideas journal, a writing habit) will be the only way you will ever practice your creativity. Rather, they are ideas for helping you get back into the practice of practicing your creativity. Then, once you are feeling more confident, you can explore your own creative path.

Why Create a Photography Practice?

First, I should point out that when I say “photography” is sounds all haughty and what I really mean is: you are going to take some pictures on your phone.

Okay, back to the “why.”

Many of us already love taking photos – love documenting awesome experiences we have and love recording histories of our loved ones. So we already do it. Now we are just going to put a little thought behind it and exercise those creative muscles some more.

By creating a photography practice you will become more confident in your skills in order to feel more comfortable sharing your photographs. You will also practice the art of storytelling with the photographs you take.

And it’s easy. Many people carry their smartphones around with them anyway – you don’t need any other equipment.

And most importantly, it’s fun.

How To Create a Photography Practice

This doesn’t need to be difficult. If you are on Instagram, as you scroll through your feed, notice the subjects of interest for various people. For example, my sister Becky only takes photos of beautiful places. There may or may not be people in there as well, but they are secondary to the landscape.

Many people have a singular focus such as this. Think about the people you follow on Instagram? Do they only post photos of hand-lettering, pottery, or woven wall hangings?

Or, there are the people who take + share photos of their daily life, or just whatever captures their interest in that moment. Their Instagram feeds are more diverse, yet still serving a single purpose.

Now think about how you take photos, or how you want to take photos? Remember your answer to that question as we get into the next part of this.

There are two ways to create a photography habit (of course there are more ways, but I can only think of two – if you can think of one, you do it another way):

Number 1

Choose a theme. Possible theme ideas:

  • Kids
  • Pets
  • Nature
  • Patterns
  • Black + White

Capture as many photographs as possible that fit into your theme. Aim for at least 20+ for the week or set a daily goal for yourself.

Number 2

Take a photo at the same time everyday for a set amount of time (a week, a month, etc.). Take a photograph each day this week at the same time. Before you get started, there are a few factors to take into consideration.

  • What time of day will you take your photographs? Choose a time that is convenient for you and that you will realistically be able to take photos all week at that same time.
  • Will you photograph the same thing everyday or whatever you see at that time each day? For example, will I photograph my dog on our walk each night, or will I photograph something new I see each night when I am out walking my dog? How many to take? Will you take just 1 photograph and live with it? Or, will you shoot a bunch and choose the best?

Set an alarm or reminder on your phone so you don’t forget to take those photos!

You will notice that as you start to take more photos, your photography will improve. You will start thinking about the light, the background, etc. even if you really do not know anything about these. By trial and error (practice) you will improve your creativity.

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today – Creating a Photography Practice.

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today - Starting an ideas journal.

Creativity in 10: Start an Ideas Journal

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today – Starting an ideas journal.

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today - Starting an ideas journal.

Here’s the story.

If you missed it, last week I started a new series called Creativity in 10. The idea is to provide you with simple ways to practice your creativity in 10 minutes or less a day. Check out last week’s post about forming a writing habit here.

Most people like the idea of being creative and practicing their creativity, but aren’t sure where to start or feel overwhelmed with all of the possibilities. So here is another simple way to practice your creativity – start an ideas journal.

You can go about this a couple of different ways. On one hand, an ideas journal is just somewhere you write down your ideas when you have them – a little notebook you keep in your pocket or purse, a Google Doc you return to online, or even just sending yourself an email with your ideas. It’s a spot to collect and organize your ideas so that you can return to them later and iterate on them.

Even more than that, this is the practice of writing down ideas. It’s very difficult to come up with good ideas on demand, especially if you are not practicing it regularly.

Getting Started With an Ideas Journal

Each day, Set the timer for 10 minutes and come up with as many ideas as possible in that time. Anything you want to focus on – whether it’s ideas for how to keep your house clean, how to save more money, your next sewing project, the novel you want to write – it doesn’t matter what your ideas are about.

You are either going to set a timer and come up with as many ideas as possible. Write down every idea that comes to mind. Do not edit yourself. Do not decide if they are good ideas, bad ideas, etc. Just write everything down.

Or, you can set an ideas goal. This is where you keep going until you hit a certain number of ideas per day (5, 10, or whatever). Once again, do not edit. Chances are that most of your ideas will be crap. Utter garbage. But, you don’t need that many good ideas, just one or a few. If you actually do this everyday, amongst all this garbage will be a few pieces of gold.

So how do you do it? Easier said than done, right?

Set an alarm on your phone for a time when you know you can work on this – first thing in the morning, during your lunch hour, right before bed. When that alarm goes off, you are Pavlov’s dog. You hear the alarm, you write your ideas down.

Or, you can just put it on your calendar as a repeating event for the next 30 days. So everyday you see it and know it is something you need to accomplish.

Figure out which of these options works for you and start practicing your creativity today!

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today - Starting an ideas journal.

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today - Forming a Writing Habit.

Creativity in 10: Form a Writing Habit

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today – Forming a Writing Habit.

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today - Forming a Writing Habit.

Here’s the story.

A few days ago I realized that I am writing so much more than any other creative activity. Which is crazy. About a year ago I shared something that basically said I didn’t even like writing. So why the change?

When I said that I didn’t like to write it’s because I was not actually writing much at that time – therefore I definitely wasn’t any good at it. This is not too say that I am the best writer now, but writing is coming so much easier to me now because I practice it EVERY SINGLE DAY. I committed to write every day and I followed through with it (i.e. I practiced it.). It’s not a concept that is difficult to understand – it actually could not be any simpler. I wanted to be better at something so I practiced and as a result I improved.

Then why do we struggle with it so much? (Myself included.) Why do we struggle to start new creative practices knowing that all we have to do to improve is commit some time and energy to it.

Since November or December my creativity has shifted and morphed and it’s been pretty interesting to witness. I am about ¾ of the way through the first draft of a non-fiction book I am writing and I have so many ideas for a novel I want to write. Now truthfully, all of my ideas + writing could be total garbage, but that’s not really the point.

A few months back I might have told that you that I had no desire to ever write a book – that was true at the time. Now I am really enjoying the process. So what changed? I did. I committed to a writing practice and that coincided with me having an idea for a book that I thought was a pretty good one. I have been able to get so much done because I write every single day. Now let me be clear, I have never sat down and written for hours at a time, I don’t think I have ever even sat down and written for more than 15 minutes at a time. At this current point in my life, I don’t have that kind of time. I have been writing in 5 or ten minute chunks.

I share this because often we hesitate to start a new project/hobby because we are going to be bad at it at first. Our work won’t look like work of the people that inspire us. We can’t see a few months into the future of how consistent practice can change that, we are too focused on the right here and right now. So this is my reminder to you that things can change with practice. So go practice already.

Here’s one easy, quick way to start today.

Creativity in 10

This will be a recurring series where I share an idea for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less. Even though ten minutes (or less) is not a significant amount of time, when you add it up over weeks, months, or even years – you will see progress in your creative practices. 

Form a Writing Habit

To form a writing habit you just have to commit to writing however often you choose for a certain amount of time o a certain amount of words/pages. If you are someone who likes to write, then obviously this is a great way for you to practice your creativity. At the same time, if you are not someone who traditionally loves to write, it’s a great way for you to improve your writing. And finally, if you are someone who doesn’t have strong feelings about it one way or another, it’s a way to continually generate new ideas and to think through the ideas that you already have. Remember, no one has to see your writing if you don’t want them to.

Here’s how to get started:

Decide where you are going to store your writing: a journal, on your computer, etc. I have a Google Doc labeled 250 Words that is currently about 60 pages long. I write there everyday.

Decide how often you are going to write: daily, weekly, only on weekends, only on weekdays. As always, you truly need to figure out what works for you, but if you will allow me to get on my soapbox for a quick minute: I think you should make it a daily practice. The only way to form a habit is to do it EVERY SINGLE DAY. In addition, if your writing practice is only on the weekends and you miss a day, that’s half of your writing for the week, whereas if you have a daily practice and you miss a day, it’s not a big deal. I’m getting down off my soapbox.

Decide what your daily writing goal is going to be: a specific number of words, a specific amount of time, etc. Do whatever works for you, but my daily goal is 250 words (which is not very much at all).

Decide how to remind yourself to write: add it to your calendar or set an alarm on your phone. You can set an alarm on your phone for a time when you know you can write – first thing in the morning, during your lunch hour, right before bed – whatever. When that alarm goes off, you are Pavlov’s dog. You hear the alarm, you start writing and don’t stop until you hit your goal. Or, you can add it to your calendar as a repeating event for the next 30 days. So everyday you see it and know it is something you need to accomplish.

How to actually get started: Once you have decide everything I mentioned above, it’s time to actually write. When you first start it can be difficult. So if you don’t already have something in mind for what you want to write about, just write whatever pops into your head – even if it is very stupid or it looks something like this:

I have to write 250 words today, so I am going to write until I get to 250 words. I am writing in a Google Doc. It is raining outside.

So obviously that is total garbage, but some days it will look like that and some days even though your goal is to write 250 words, you might easily write a thousand. Either way you have to show up and get it down each day so that you can see progress.

Start writing!

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today - Forming a Writing Habit.

maker post header

From Inspiration Hoarder to Maker

Today’s the day to make the shift from inspiration hoarder mode to a maker mindset. There’s just a few steps to get started. 

Today's the day to make the shift from inspiration hoarder mode to a maker mindset. There's just a few steps to get started.

Here’s the story.

Today you are going to transform from an inspiration hoarder to a maker.

Tell me if this sounds familiar.

You love finding inspiration – whether it is on Pinterest, blogs, magazines or somewhere else. It doesn’t matter if it is craft projects, DIY projects, or something else entirely. You are constantly coming across totally awesome stuff you want to make. But, after awhile you start to notice that you have collected hoards of inspiration but have yet to do anything with it.

Today that changes.

Today you go from inspiration hoarder to maker.

Maybe you collect all kinds of ideas because you like them – great, you should continue to do that – but you have a hard time getting started with them because you don’t necessarily have the skills to do it, or the project materials might be expensive, or maybe you don’t have the time right now to commit to completing the project. Any one of these reasons could be what is keeping you from getting started.

So you don’t do that project – then you don’t do any project.

Your goal today is going to be to find a project that you can complete. Keep it small, minimal, somewhat simple. You want to get an easy win on this one and transform your mindset from someone who collects inspiration but does not follow through into that of that into a maker – someone who see an idea or finds inspiration + actually creates something.

If you want to be a maker, you actually have to do that work – you have to make stuff.

The first thing to decide is what you want to make. This should be easy because you already have so much inspiration saved up. Head over to wherever it is that you collect your inspiration – Pinterest, a journal, a notebook, a bulletin board, a folder on your desktop, etc. Go through it. Pick something simple. You are looking for something that will take an hour or less of your time. Also, choose a project where you already have the materials or you can easily find them at a local store. Choose a project that will allow you to get started right away.

If you’ve got a big long list of inspiration, go through and cross off the ones that are going to take you too much time. Then cross off all of the ones that you need to learn a new skill for. (One point – I’m not saying cross them off forever, just for now until you get started with a creative habit). Cross all the ones that require materials that are too expensive.

Here’s my example. Here is my DIY board on Pinterest. These are all things that I think are awesome, pretty, or in some cases totally awesome. I want to make them all!

Today's the day to make the shift from inspiration hoarder mode to a maker mindset. There's just a few steps to get started.

Now here is my board with projects crossed off that I thought would be too difficult, too time consuming or too expensive for my first one. Here’s the project I am going to do first.

 

Today's the day to make the shift from inspiration hoarder mode to a maker mindset. There's just a few steps to get started. I picked my project – something easy with only a few materials and hard to mess up – the project that is going to help me go from inspiration hoarder to maker.

Next, I am going to figure out what resources/materials I need to complete this project. I’ll make a list and gather them.

Then, if I think about my time – when can I actually do this? During my kids’ nap time? After work + dinner? A chunk of time on the weekend? If you are actually going to do this, you need to prepare so that when you have that chunk of time, you actually execute – you make something! Instead of saying that I only have an hour and I need to decide what I want to do, go to the store, learn a new skill, etc. Not going to happen that way!

Set yourself up for success by doing the preparations first. 

Finally, Is there anything you need to learn before trying? If I I want to hand-letter, should I watch some Youtube videos, or should I just start making. Decide now.

Go make.

Wait, wait, wait. Hold on. One very important point I need to make.

Your first go round is probably going to suck. Most likely it won’t look just like that pin from Pinterest. It’s not going to look just like that Instagram post. You are probably going to feel bad about that, it’s natural. But, then stop and think. Whoever made the source of inspiration probably made it a few times to get it to look perfect. Or, they practice their creativity all the time, so it is going to look amazing. Whereas this is the first time you have tried it, so of course it is not going to look the same. Understand that as you shift from inspiration hoarder mode to a maker mindset, you are probably going to create some total garbage at first. But you have to do that in order to get to the good stuff. You might even throw away some of the stuff you make – that’s okay. You are putting in the practice so that you can increase your skills.

Okay, back to it – go make something!

You did it? Awesome some sauce.

Okay, here is the deal. Going from inspiration hoarder to maker is not a one time transition unless you actually make a practice habit out of it.

Here are some links to making a creative practice habit. Here and here.

Get started!

Today's the day to make the shift from inspiration hoarder mode to a maker mindset. There's just a few steps to get started.

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How To Focus Your Creativity When You Have Too Many Interests

If your personal brand of creativity is a variety of hobbies/crafts/activities, how do you practice them all? How do you stay up to date on them all? How do you not let some of them fall by the wayside?

If your personal brand of creativity is a variety of hobbies/crafts/activities, how do you practice them all? How do you stay up to date on them all? How do you not let some of them fall by the wayside?Here’s the story.

The following assumes that you have identified your personal brand of creativity – you know how you are creative. If you are not to that point yet, click here for help.

So you know your personal brand of creativity – you know that you ARE creative and you know HOW you are creative. Awesome.

One problem – Your personal brand of creativity is a variety of activities/hobbies/ventures/whatever you want to call it. You went through the entire process of identifying your personal brand of creativity and realized you are not just:

  • A carpenter
  • A baker
  • A knitter
  • A painter
  • A juggler

Instead, you’ve got a whole heap of creative interests.  They are not anything and everything, but there is still a variety of interests there.

For example:

Maybe the creative pursuits that make up your personal brand of creativity are all “crafts” such as knitting, sewing, crocheting, etc.

Or maybe your creative pursuits are not connected in any way other than the fact that you enjoy all of them. That still works.

It’s even okay if your personal brand of creativity is a bit of a hot mess like this: A lit bit of photography, some hand-lettering, and you want to get around to learning how to paint. Also, you have a bunch of hobbies you are interested in and love to make stuff for your house and others. You occasionally you try your hand at various fiber crafts or crafty crafts like a wreath for each season. But then you are also learning how to use your camera well enough to take photos of your kids each season/year. You love to bake + cook. You aren’t amazing but you love trying out new recipes and foods. Yes, a bit of a hot mess. THIS IS STILL PERFECT. And in reality, this is probably the most realistic for each of us.

Your personal brand of creativity is a variety of things and that is 100% okay.

One Problem.

How do you practice them all? How do you stay up to date on them all? How do you not let some of them fall by the wayside?

The beauty of having a personal brand of creativity such as this is that it doesn’t have to be perfectly laid out in front of you. You know you like a variety of creative activities. Some of them you already know how to do, but you also might learn a few new things each year. Whether it is something quick + easy like a few new recipes for cookies at the holidays, or a larger undertaking like learning to knit. The beauty of your personal brand of creativity is that it is not regimented. It grows + changes with you.

Back to the problem – how do you practice all aspects of your personal brand of creativity?

When your personal brand of creativity is a number of different hobbies/activities/ventures, your practice plan is not going to be like:

Monday – knitting

Tuesday – photography

Thursday – sewing

And so on. Unless you prefer your crafts like days of the week underwear.

It needs to be more of whatever is inspiring you at the time, or whatever season of your life you are in at the time + you decide what you feel like doing/making/creating. Otherwise it becomes a chore. If I were you, I would create a list of all the things I love to do. My list would look something like this:

  • Knit
  • Sew
  • Scrapbook
  • Photography
  • Visual thinking
  • Coding
  • Website design
  • Design priniciples
  • Hand letter
  • Some of these I already know and some I want to learn

Post that list somewhere you can see it. So when you are feeling uninspired or when you don’t know what I want to work on, all you have to do is take a look at the list for some options. Then you know exactly what you have to work with. If I’m in the middle of a knitting project, I can pick up right in the middle of that. Or I can go check out my sewing board on Pinterest to see what I want to sew next. It’s a sneaky little way of being inspired by yourself.

In addition to deciding WHAT to practice, you are need to develop your practice habits.

You need to figure out:

  • How much time do I have to practice my creativity?
  • How often am I going to practice?
  • What’s the best way to go about this?

Do you put on your calendar: creative time is MWF from 8:30 – 9:00. That is my me time, my creative time. Depending on your personality, you can decide that day or at the beginning of the week. I’d encourage you to think about it a little bit ahead of time so that you don’t waste your creative time trying to decide what to do or realizing that you don’t have the necessary materials on hand.

Like any other personal brand of creativity, you will just see where this take you. It might be that after a few months of trying this out regularly, you might decide that you love hand-lettering so much, so you are going to focus on that for three – four months or so. Maybe even a year. Or you do it for 3 – 4 months, then feel like oh man I have so many great ideas for sewing, I need to get back into that. It might be that you pop back and forth from creative ventures or that you wear different creative hats for different time periods. It’s up to you to determine how to execute, but the idea is to develop the creative habit, it doesn’t matter how you practice it OR what you do to practice it, just that you are making time for yourself and your creativity and that you are happy with it.

If your personal brand of creativity is a variety of hobbies/crafts/activities, how do you practice them all? How do you stay up to date on them all? How do you not let some of them fall by the wayside?

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Needed: Creative Confidence

Whatever your next step is, you are going to be held back from taking it until you become confident in yourself, your skills, and your creativity.

Needed: Creative Confidence - Whatever your next step is, you are going to be held back from taking it until you become confident in yourself, your skills, and your creativity.

Here’s the story.

Imagine for a second that you know you are a creative person. This may or may not be true. Either way, it’s not the time to have the I’m not creative argument. So just play along.

Imagine, you know you are creative. Check.

Imagine, you know how you are creative. Check.

But, there is one teeny tiny problem. You are suffering from some serious creative doubt. You lack confidence in yourself as a creative bad-ass.

So how to change that?

I can tell you to be a confident person, but we all know that doesn’t really do anything.

So how do you gain confidence?

Number 1

Get over yourself. Stop doubting yourself. Stop worrying about what other people might think of your creativity. The truth is no one cares, and if they do and are assholes about it, you don’t need to care about them. I realize this tough talk is much easier said than actually carried out, so here are a few things you can actually do to build your creative confidence.

Number 2

Practice, Practice, practice. Whether you are just starting out or have been at it for some time, there is no way around it. You can’t be confident without putting in the time. Well, technically you can be, but nobody likes those people. The more you practice, the more confident you will become. It’s as easy as that. But, truthfully, it isn’t easy. It’s not easy to make your creativity a priority daily or weekly, but if you want to see the results, then it’s the only way.

Practice until there is nothing else you can say besides I am good enough. “My creative is good enough.” Practice until that’s the only answer left.

Number 3

I know what you are thinking, “okay smartie pants, I have been practicing for forever and I am still lack confidence.” Okay, then this idea if for you. I challenge you to make yourself uncomfortable. Like, really really uncomfortable. Like when you are stuck between two people having the most awkward conversation ever and you have no way out – that kind of uncomfortable.

Why make yourself uncomfortable? You will face a fear. You will force yourself to try something you had previously told yourself you could not or would not do. You most likely will learn something new about yourself, whether it is the fact that you can face your fear and still survive, or even just a new skill that you learn.

One of the best ways to get out of a rut is to try something new. By trying something new, you usually have to make yourself uncomfortable. It’s not fun to suck at something. Especially as an adult. We are used to being good at whatever it is that we do regularly, so it is definitely out of our comfort zone.

What makes you uncomfortable? This is different for everyone:

  • Picking up the phone and calling someone.
  • Signing up for a class so you can learn something new.
  • Trying to make a new friend.
  • Sharing your work with others

Trying something new is scary as shit, but if you ACTUALLY do it, what an amazing high. Then, you have to make yourself do something again, and again.

You can practice until you are blue in the face but if you don’t actually BELIEVE in yourself you are never going to feel confident in your craft, in your creative venture.

Number 4

Fake it until you make it. Maybe you aren’t confident but if you were a confident person, what would your next step be? For example… If I were confident in my writing abilities, I would email this person and pitch them this great idea I have. I’m not confident in my writing abilities – I’m thinking that my writing isn’t good enough (yet), my website isn’t good enough (yet), so I probably should wait longer. No. If I were confident in those things, I would email, so that is what I am going to do. I’ll go ahead.  The worst that can happen? They say no. I move on.
You need creative confidence. Whatever your next step is, you are going to be held back from taking it until you become confident in yourself, your skills, and your creativity.  Whether that is going pro, sharing your work with the world, going somewhere and learning from someone, emailing someone + asking a question. Whatever it is, you need to build your creative confidence. This is not to say that you need to walk around thinking you are the best. But, you must know your creativity is good enough.

Needed: Creative Confidence - Whatever your next step is, you are going to be held back from taking it until you become confident in yourself, your skills, and your creativity.

The Lazy Girl's (or Guy's) Guide to Practicing Your Creativity - Practicing your creativity doesn’t need to be difficult or time consuming. Just start be doing the smallest thing.

The Lazy Girl’s (or Guy’s) Guide to Practicing Your Creativity

Practicing your creativity doesn’t need to be difficult or time consuming. Just start be doing the smallest thing.

The Lazy Girl's (or Guy's) Guide to Practicing Your Creativity - Practicing your creativity doesn’t need to be difficult or time consuming. Just start be doing the smallest thing.

Here’s the story.

Who’s got two thumbs and thinks that a perfect day would be spent on the couching reading a book cover to cover while stuffing my face with trail mix? This girl.

I think in my heart of hearts I am a truly lazy person, I just try to fight it most days, but every once in awhile my lazy side wins out and I waste time binge-ing on an amazing show (or just a decent one) or reading a book start to finish without moving off the couch. Now, truthfully since having kids these kinds of days are few and far between but a girl can still dream, right?

But, that’s what my laziness looks like – back to yours.

Your laziness might show itself in any number of infinite ways. For that reason, this week I have got 9 ways to start practicing your creativity while putting forth the least amount of effort possible (Sidebar – a top ten list would have been better, but I couldn’t think of a 10th way so I figured a lazy person would just stop at #9). This is practicing your creativity – the lazy way.

Normally we consider someone to be lazy when they don’t want to put forth too much effort, spend too much time on something, or really just commit to anything they might consider “too much”. So how can you stick to those guidelines and still practice your creativity?

Easy.

Start by doing the smallest thing.

Often time we fail to follow through with new creative ventures, workouts, diets, etc. because in addition to other factors, we try to do to much at once. Instead of setting ourselves up for failure, let’s do the opposite today. What’s the smallest thing you can do to practice your creativity?

What does “doing the smallest thing” look like? I’m so glad you asked!

The Lazy Girl's (or Guy's) Guide to Practicing Your Creativity - Practicing your creativity doesn’t need to be difficult or time consuming. Just start be doing the smallest thing.

Number 1

Name a TV show that you absolutely cannot miss each week (or your favorite sports team that is currently in season). Now, I know there is no way you are going to skip it, so we will just have to work some creative practice into it. Every time a commercial break starts, start writing and don’t stop until the show/game comes back on. Next commercial break – repeat. **For those of you like myself who haven’t watched a commercial in like 4 years, get your writing in at the end of your favorite show. You saved yourself 15 minutes by not watching commercials. Use that time to write.

Number 2

Get out paper and some paints. Start painting and don’t stop until you have either used every color you have or completing covered the canvas/paper. You don’t need to think about it anymore that.

Number 3

Get out a piece of paper and start doodling. Don’t stop until you have covered the entire page. You are just doodling, don’t expect it to be a work of art. Let your mind wander and doodle whatever you feel like.

Number 4

Turn on the shower. Start singing. Don’t stop singing until you turn the water off. One caveat, you can only sing original songs – so you better make it up as you go.

Number 5

Write down every idea in your head until you get to ten ideas. Don’t edit as you. Most of them will be terrible ideas – write them down anyway. If you do this often enough, chances are there will be some good ideas in there somewhere.

Number 6

Listen to a podcast or audiobook. Learn something new. You might get inspired and have your next great idea. Take note, I’m not even asking you to put worth the effort to read – you can definitely listen to something while you drive, workout, cook, go for a walk, fold laundry, etc.

Number 7

Scroll through your camera roll choose 3 unrelated photos and make up a story about them. Tell someone that story. Don’t take new photos, just work with what you already have.

Number 8

Quit a project. If something no longer inspires you, quit it. . If it no longer inspires you and you don’t want to do, what’s the point?. It’s a waste of your time. Quit it and move on to something that you are excited about.

Maybe you have been holding off starting something new because you haven’t yet finished, X, Y, or Z. So quit it. Don’t let them be your excuse for not trying something new that you are excited about.

Number 9

Chunk a project down into smaller, realistic pieces. Are you excited + inspired to try something new, but at that same time overwhelmed by it? Break the project down into individual tasks that you can actually work on each day. For example, if you are knitting a new scarf, commit to working on one line a day. If you feel like working on it more than that, awesome, but you won’t feel like a failure for not living up to it if you overcommit yourself.

So to summarize, you should quit when it gets tough and not do anything that requires too much effort.

Kidding. Kind of.

These are ways to get STARTED practicing your creativity. As you continue, you will figure out exactly what you want to do and learn how to make it a part of your daily life.

new post header

You Know You’re Creative? Awesome. Now Start Practicing.

It’s time to have fun. This is the part where you get to start practicing your personal brand of creativity – i.e. do exactly what you want to do.

You Know You're Creative? Awesome. Now Start Practicing! It’s time to have fun. This is the part where you get to start practicing your personal brand of creativity - i.e. do exactly what you want to do.

Here’s the story.

With the help of the Find Your Creativity Adventure email course and the last two week’s emails, you identified your personal brand of creativity. Awesome. Knowledge is power, but only if you do something with that knowledge.

So what to do, what to do?

It’s time to have fun. This is the part where you get to start practicing your personal brand of creativity – i.e. do exactly what you want to do.

Getting started can sometimes be a little overwhelming and you might not know where to begin. Have no fear! If you are having some trouble getting started practicing your personal brand of creativity, here are a few ideas to help you.

Number 1

There can be any number of excuses reasons you might be putting off practicing your creativity, but time does not need to be one of them. I get it, you’re busy. Everyone is busy. Practicing your creativity doesn’t need to take over your life. It’s supposed to be fun – not feel like a chore or one more thing you need to check off your to-do list. If you need some help getting started, click here to read a post I wrote awhile back: 10 Ways to Inject Creativity Into Your Daily Life. The best part? Each of the ideas I shared can be done in 10 minutes or less. In addition, most of these are open-ended and can be used in any way you see fit. Allow yourself time to practice your creativity knowing that it will not takeover your life. Give yourself time to play!

You Know You're Creative? Awesome. Now Start Practicing! It’s time to have fun. This is the part where you get to start practicing your personal brand of creativity - i.e. do exactly what you want to do.

Number 2

Investigate your creativity further. Yes, you know that your personal brand of creativity is ____________________. But, at this point you don’t know everything there is to know about it, so before jumping in head first, just play – try-it out. 

You Know You're Creative? Awesome. Now Start Practicing! It’s time to have fun. This is the part where you get to start practicing your personal brand of creativity - i.e. do exactly what you want to do.

Number 3

Take a creative field trip. At this point you know your personal brand of creativity, now it’s time to hit the road.  Take a field trip somewhere to see something/anything related to your personal brand of creativity. If part of your personal brand of creativity is baking, what can you do to observe it? Take a baking class. Watch someone bake. Walk around a store with baking equipment and get inspired. Go to a bakery. If part of your personal brand of creativity is building furniture. Go watch a carpenter. Go to a furniture store and check out the tables.

You Know You're Creative? Awesome. Now Start Practicing! It’s time to have fun. This is the part where you get to start practicing your personal brand of creativity - i.e. do exactly what you want to do.

After checking reading through the three ideas I shared. Steal at least one of them and implement it immediately. Start practicing your creativity today!

You Know You're Creative? Awesome. Now Start Practicing! It’s time to have fun. This is the part where you get to start practicing your personal brand of creativity - i.e. do exactly what you want to do.

The Best Part of Being on a Team? Find about by joining CREATIVITY + COLLABORATION - a free Facebook group where you can find inspiration + motivation to find your creativity and start practicing it.

The Best Part of Being on A Team

The Best Part of Being on a Team? Find about by joining CREATIVITY + COLLABORATION - a free Facebook group where you can find inspiration + motivation to find your creativity and start practicing it.

A couple of months ago, I relaunched my website with a new vision for Greens & Blues Co. In addition to vowing to no longer publish theoretical posts, I also was rethinking the type of community I could provide for you.

I’m a people person. I like to talk and I like people. So having a group of people to potentially collaborate with, chat with, etc. about something as important as my creativity is important to me.

I know many of you are the same. Even if you don’t consider yourself a people person or something who usually “joins in” there are many benefits to having a group of people you can turn to when you need it. Despite the fact that you have friends and family, sometimes you need someone who understands this side of you – your creative side!

Anyone who has ever been part of a team, sports or otherwise, can tell you that the best part about being on a team is, of course, your teammates. There is nothing like having teammates to drive you and make you better. The same notion can be applied to a group of people practicing their creativity.

Living a creative life can be different for everyone however we can encourage each other, push each other to go further, to work harder than we would on our own, to try something new, to practice, to do our best – all just by working together. Collaboration can help us take our skills in a particular creative venture to the next level, or to get over ourselves and try something new. Teammates, or just people to collaborate with, challenge us to continually improve our craft.

So what team are you going to join when it comes to your creativity?

The Best Part of Being on a Team? Find about by joining CREATIVITY + COLLABORATION - a free Facebook group where you can find inspiration + motivation to find your creativity and start practicing it.

Your team could made up of:

A good teammate should be:

  • Practicing their own creativity
  • Willing to help others practice their own
  • Striving to get better

It’s great if you have a group of friends or co-workers and you can get together to support each other’s creativity. But, the truth is, most of us don’t have that. So, what do you do then? Who do you  go to for support? For creative inspiration? For motivation? For resources? CREATIVITY + COLLABORATION.

So what action can you take today? Easy. Take one simple step. Join CREATIVITY + COLLABORATION.