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Clean Slate Creativity is a 4 week, step-by-step guide to help you wipe your creative slate clean and start fresh. Up in Week 4 is figuring out what's next. Let’s get to it!

Clean Slate Creativity: What’s Next

Clean Slate Creativity is a 4 week, step-by-step guide to help you wipe your creative slate clean and start fresh. Up in Week 4 is figuring out next steps. Let’s get to it!

Clean Slate Creativity is a 4 week, step-by-step guide to help you wipe your creative slate clean and start fresh. Up in Week 4 is figuring out what's next. Let’s get to it!

Here’s the story. (In case you missed it, here’s week 1week 2, and week 3).

For the final week of Clean Slate Creativity, you are going to figure out your next steps using what you have learned about you + your creativity so far.

Truthfully, you already have your answer(s) for what is next for you and your creativity. Remember you are starting fresh with your creativity. So if you decided that you want to learn how to quilt, or draw, or figure skate, or use power tools – it doesn’t matter. You are a beginner and that is awesome. You most likely (unless you are a freak of nature) you are going to be bad at first – you are supposed to be. Embrace this time as a beginner. Think back to if you were 7 + 8, you sucked at drawing then but you did it anyway. You have to suck for awhile, it’s all part of the process.

Okay, so step 1 is to embrace the suck. Well, not really.

Step 1 is to look back at weeks 2 + 3 (mostly 3) and make a statement about where you want to go with your creativity next.

Fill in the blank: I want to ___________________________. Great. Now how are you going to do that?

How are you going to learn to sew? How are you going to draw? How are you going to learn to play the guitar? To take photos? To design a website?

Step 2: Gather Resources + Materials/Tools

Now that you know what you what to practice, it’s time to figure out the how.

If you are starting a new creative practice, most likely you are going to have to learn something new. Even if you are an expert knitter, but you haven’t picked up yarn and needles for the past ten years, you likely are going to need a little help brushing up your skills. Or the opposite end of the spectrum, maybe you are a complete novice and are looking to try something new – to flex your creative muscles a bit more. Either way, decide how you are going to learn: visit your local knit shop and sign up for a course, watch some Youtube videos, set-up a date with your neighbor who knits – whatever it is, make a decision about HOW you will learn.

**It’s also important to note here that you know yourself best and know what kind of learner you are. If you do not do well, or follow through, when you say you are going to learn on your own. Then don’t do it that way. Think about how you actually like to learn and how you are successful and make a plan based on that.

In addition, mostly likely you will need tools or materials of some kind. Figure out what they are (Google it, ask someone, etc.) and get them. Remember, when starting a new creative venture, it is not necessary to have every fancy tool. Just start with the basics. If you find that you enjoy this venture, you can always upgrade later. You don’t want to jump in credit card first into a new project without testing the waters first. That’s how you end up with a craft room, garage, basement, whatever full of creative projects you have started, but not followed through on. Keep it simple. You can always scale up if you enjoy it.

Number 3: Make a Plan

It’s awesome that you are starting a new creative venture, but when are you going to work on it? Just buying the tools and materials is not going to get you anywhere – except with a craft room full on projects you are “going to get to someday.”

It’s time to take action! Start living it! If you are realistically going to make a change in your life, you need to take an honest look at your days and see where you can make changes. Everyone is busy. I get it. But how busy are you with things that actually matter to you? What I mean, most likely you aren’t going to quit your job or starting ignoring your friends or kids, so where will you get the time to practice your creativity? You need to make room so you can live what you love.

What are some areas of your life you will need to minimize in order to devote quality time to your creative path? TV? Social media? What are you willing to give up – or at least cut back on? Think about when you say you are going to just watch tv for a half hour, or just look at Facebook for five minutes, how long does it really end up turning into? Is it possible that you could take some of that time and work on your creative spark for 30 minutes per day?

What areas of your life will you need to maximize in order to devote quality time to your creative path? Where can you find pockets of wasted time throughout your day? Do you have to wait while your kids are at a lesson or practice? Do you waste fifteen minutes waiting for someone to show up to a meeting or for an appointment? If you plan ahead each day, you can better utilize some of your normally wasted time.

How often can you realistically work on this new practice? Daily? Weekly? Monthly? Be honest with yourself; be realistic with your time and your ability. As you are learning something new, everything is going to take longer than it will down the road. Add it to your calendar – be specific on your calendar. What time of day are you going to work on it and for how long. If you know it is going to be a stretch or even impossible for you to do it every single day, then don’t put that on your plan. Set yourself up for success, not failure.

Number 4: Start

Get started. Learn it. Make it. Create it. Design it. Build it. Whatever you are planning, do it. Start.

**One tip, tell people about it. It’s a good way to hold yourself accountable

Number 5: Reflect

After you have tried out your new creative venture, it is vital that you stop and reflect.

Are you enjoying yourself? Do you want to learn more/increase your skills? Is there a better way to spend your free time?

If you are enjoying yourself and happy, keep going with it! If you are not, do not be afraid to quit and try something new.

Remember, it’s going to be ugly at first.

Well that’s it folks. You made it through all 4 weeks of Clean Slate Creativity. If you need any help along the way, please email me at greensandbluesco AT gmail.com.

**If you are interested in joining the Clean Slate Creativity Facebook group, you can click here. It’s a great place for reminders to practice your creativity, inspiration + motivation.

Clean Slate Creativity is a 4 week, step-by-step guide to help you wipe your creative slate clean and start fresh. Up in Week 4 is figuring out next steps. Let’s get to it!

 

Clean Slate Creativity is a 4 week, step-by-step guide to help you wipe your creative slate clean and start fresh. Up in Week 3 is analyzing your responses. Let’s get to it!

Clean Slate Creativity: Your Responses

Clean Slate Creativity is a 4 week, step-by-step guide to help you wipe your creative slate clean and start fresh. Up in Week 3 is analyzing your responses. Let’s get to it!

Clean Slate Creativity is a 4 week, step-by-step guide to help you wipe your creative slate clean and start fresh. Up in Week 3 is analyzing your responses. Let’s get to it!

Here’s the story. (In case you missed it, here’s week 1 and week 2).

Welcome back to the Clean Slate Creativity Series. 

To recap, so far you have wiped the slate clean + started fresh with your creativity. Last week, I had you try 4 different exercises in order to look at your creativity with fresh eyes. Pull out those worksheets again.

Now, take a step back. Let’s play pretend for a minute here. Make up a fake person. My fake person is going to be Meghan. Meghan is struggling to figure out how she is creative and and asked for my help. So, if Meghan gave me these worksheets, what feedback would I give her?

It seems like a silly way of going about this, but for most of us, we are much nicer to other people than we are to ourselves. I’m sure (hopefully) that you would never give fake Meghan the feedback of, “you are horrible at drawing.” Or, “this doesn’t make any sense.” No. You would take the time to analyze and reflect on what Meghan said and what she didn’t say. Then you would provide her with some constructive feedback.

Let’s take a closer look at each exercise and you can determine what specific feedback you would give to your fake person.

Exercise #1

Look at your page for this exercise. To be perfectly honest, this one may or may not help. It is so open ended that it might not be related in anyway. Let’s take a look at Meghan’s (my) response to Exercise #1:

Screen Shot 2017-07-18 at 1.40.20 PM

Using the information from Meghan’s response, it would be simple to give her feedback: she has a number of creative practices she seems interested in. It’s not clear whether these are creative practices she already does or practices she is interested in learning more about + getting started with.

*When I wrote these responses I had creativity/creative practices on my mind, so my response is rather on point whereas your’s might have been on something completely different – like your grocery list. So no worries if you didn’t get a lot of great information from this first exercise. The other 3 will help!

Exercises #2 – 4

Read through your fake person’s response for each of these exercises. Do you see any patterns forming? Take a look at fake Meghan’s (my) responses for these exercises:

 

My feedback to Meghan is that she doesn’t seem to be lacking ideas for how to practice her creativity. That’s awesome. However, if she tries to focus on all of these at once, she will probably get overwhelmed and end up not doing any of it. Instead, she should write all of these ideas down on a list. Then go through the list and determine which one she is actually interested in learning + practicing now.

This is the point to actually think about time, cost, skills required, etc. Narrow the list down to one and that is where she should start practicing her creativity. But, she should hang that list somewhere she will see it often. That way, if she starts weaving but soon decides it’s not really for her, instead of starting this process over she can jump right into another creative practice!

Hopefully once you have provided yourself/your fake person with some feedback you will have an idea of how you WANT to practice your creativity. If you feel like you are stuck and can’t figure it out, there are two things you can try.

Number 1

Ask someone you trust to take a look the responses to the exercises and give you feedback.

Number 2

Email me your worksheets (greensandbluesco AT gmail.com) and I will give you my feedback!

One week left in our Clean Slate Creativity series. Next week, you put your creativity into practice! See you then.

Clean Slate Creativity is a 4 week, step-by-step guide to help you wipe your creative slate clean and start fresh. Up in Week 3 is analyzing your responses. Let’s get to it!

 

Clean Slate Creativity is a 4 week, step-by-step guide to help you wipe your creative slate clean and start fresh. Up in Week 2 is starting fresh. Let’s get to it!

Clean Slate Creativity: Start Fresh

Clean Slate Creativity is a 4 week, step-by-step guide to help you wipe your creative slate clean and start fresh. Up in Week 2 is starting fresh. Let’s get to it!

Clean Slate Creativity is a 4 week, step-by-step guide to help you wipe your creative slate clean and start fresh. Up in Week 2 is starting fresh. Let’s get to it!

Here’s the story. (If you missed Week 1, you can find it here).

Now that you have wiped your creative slate clean, you are ready to start fresh.

How does a kid approach creativity?

Imagine if you entered a room with paper and a basket of markers on the table. If you were a kid, mostly likely you would simply uncap a marker and dive in. As an adult, more likely you might preface it with something like, “well I am not good at drawing, but…” or “I am a horrible artist.”

It’s like we expect everyone to judge every mark we make (I guess we get that from years in school). Anyway, clean slate creativity is about starting over.

Today, I’m not going to waste time convincing you that you are in fact creative. Since you wiped your creative slate clean, you are basically going back to childhood when everyone knows that they are creative. Instead, I’m going to prove to you that you are creative. I hope you’ll join me in completing a few simple exercises. Download your worksheets here if you haven’t already done so.

Get those worksheets filled out!

This is where we stop for week 2. I promised it wouldn’t be too much work at once:) Hold onto these worksheets for next week. You are going to analyze your response to each exercise. See you next week!

Clean Slate Creativity is a 4 week, step-by-step guide to help you wipe your creative slate clean and start fresh. Up in Week 2 is starting fresh. Let’s get to it!

Clean Slate Creativity is a 4 week, step-by-step guide to help you wipe your creative slate clean and start fresh. Up first in Week 1 is wiping that slate clean. Let's get to it!

Clean Slate Creativity: Wipe the Slate Clean

Clean Slate Creativity is a 4 week, step-by-step guide to help you wipe your creative slate clean and start fresh. Up first in Week 1 is wiping that slate clean. Let’s get to it!

Clean Slate Creativity is a 4 week, step-by-step guide to help you wipe your creative slate clean and start fresh. Up first in Week 1 is wiping the slate clean. Let's get to it!

Here’s the story.

I often advocate that you can figure out how you are creative now (and how you want to be creative now) by taking a look at your creative past. However, for some people that doesn’t work out because they get too hung up on their creative shortcomings in the past.

If you are a part of our Facebook group (you can click here to join) you may have noticed a few months back, I changed the name of our group. It is now – Clean Slate Creativity! The name change came from the idea: what if you could start over with your creative life? Go back to whenever it was when you were younger when you went down one path creatively. At that time most of us were not aware that we were making decisions that could affect the rest of our lives!

Now, as adults, we deserve to start fresh with our creativity and not get hung up on anything from the past (I’m not creative, I can’t draw, I never took any art classes, yada yada yada). 

Today we are wiping the slate clean and starting fresh!

If I asked you to reflect on your creative past – when you were still a kid, most people would have the similar reflections:

I was creative and I practiced it in a variety of way – drawing, coloring, imaginary play, singing, etc.

If I asked you to reflect on your creative past from somewhere around the ages of 10 – 16 – this would be the point where everyone’s stories would diverge down different paths. Yet, many of your stories (and mine) could fall into 1 of 3 categories.

  1. You were creative and you practiced your creativity in a variety of ways until someone made you and your creativity feel less than. Since then you have been hesitant to practice your creativity + even more shy about sharing it.
  2. You were creative and everyone knew it. Your creativity was on display 24/7 in your activities, the way you acted, and what you wore.
  3. You were creative when you were younger but now you just simply choose to spend time on other interests – friends, sports, school, etc.

Back to the present –  think about where you are today with your creativity.

  • Do you know you are creative and practice your creativity regularly?
  • Do you know you could be creative, but aren’t sure where/how to start?
  • Do you have so many creative activities that you don’t know where or how to focus your attention?
  • Do you think you aren’t creative?

It doesn’t matter which option you chose. It’s time to wipe the slate clean. We are going to get rid of your creative past + start fresh.  Let go all your past creative experiences  – GOOD + BAD! We are starting anew.

When we pick up again next week, each of you will start with a clean slate when it comes to your creativity. See you then!

Clean Slate Creativity is a 4 week, step-by-step guide to help you wipe your creative slate clean and start fresh. Up first in Week 1 is wiping the slate clean. Let's get to it!