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Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today – Start A Drawing Habit.

Creativity in 10: Start a Drawing Habit

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today – Start A Drawing Habit.

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today – Start A Drawing Habit.

Here’s the story.

For many of you, the immediate reaction to seeing this headline is “hell no, I can’t draw.” I’m right there with you. If you have been around here for any amount of time, or are currently following me on Instagram you will have seen my little drawings (I usually refer to them as visual thinking).

To put it nicely they are rough. I can say with absolute certainty that when it comes to drawing – I am the worst 🙂  So I decided that if I was going to share the idea of starting a drawing habit as a simple and quick way to practice your creativity, I needed to put my money where my mouth is and try it too.

So I did it. I set a timer for ten minutes and started drawing. I decided to use a pen so that I couldn’t second guess myself and try to make everything perfect. At first, I was just going to try and cover the page in different drawings, but after drawing the same flower and circle design I have been doodling since 5th grade, I decided to start over. I got a new piece of paper and just starting drawing the door in front of my desk. It was mostly straight lines so it couldn’t be too bad, right?

I worked on it for about ten minutes. I was very happy when the 10 minutes was up. Although, if I am being truthful, I was looking forward to trying it again. Drawing made me stretch my creative muscles in a way that I haven’t tried in awhile. Like I said, I’m the worst at drawing. Give me a craft like sewing or knitting any day. But, combining my lack of skill and practice with my desire to always continue to learn – a part of me definitely wants to work on my drawing more.

I don’t know what I was expecting, there is no way it was going to look good – I haven’t practiced drawing in forever. But, it was a little freeing to try something I know I’m going to be bad at and just do it anyway.

Enough about me. Your turn.

Like all of the other exercises in the Creativity in 10 series (photo, writing, ideas), starting a drawing habit is quick and simple. You only need a pen/pencil and paper. Once again, you have several options.

  • Set a timer and go for a certain amount of time.
  • Or get a piece of paper and draw until you have covered the paper entirely.
  • You can attempt to draw something you see, or just whatever you can see in your imagination.
  • Start by drawing lines and shapes. See where it takes you.

Give it a try – you won’t regret it!

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today – Start A Drawing Habit.

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today – Creating a Photography Practice.

Creativity in 10: Create a Photography Practice

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today – Creating a Photography Practice.

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today – Creating a Photography Practice.

Here’s the story.

With Creativity in 10, we are once again exploring possibilities for practicing your creativity in 10 minutes or less each day. This is not to say that these ideas (photography, an ideas journal, a writing habit) will be the only way you will ever practice your creativity. Rather, they are ideas for helping you get back into the practice of practicing your creativity. Then, once you are feeling more confident, you can explore your own creative path.

Why Create a Photography Practice?

First, I should point out that when I say “photography” is sounds all haughty and what I really mean is: you are going to take some pictures on your phone.

Okay, back to the “why.”

Many of us already love taking photos – love documenting awesome experiences we have and love recording histories of our loved ones. So we already do it. Now we are just going to put a little thought behind it and exercise those creative muscles some more.

By creating a photography practice you will become more confident in your skills in order to feel more comfortable sharing your photographs. You will also practice the art of storytelling with the photographs you take.

And it’s easy. Many people carry their smartphones around with them anyway – you don’t need any other equipment.

And most importantly, it’s fun.

How To Create a Photography Practice

This doesn’t need to be difficult. If you are on Instagram, as you scroll through your feed, notice the subjects of interest for various people. For example, my sister Becky only takes photos of beautiful places. There may or may not be people in there as well, but they are secondary to the landscape.

Many people have a singular focus such as this. Think about the people you follow on Instagram? Do they only post photos of hand-lettering, pottery, or woven wall hangings?

Or, there are the people who take + share photos of their daily life, or just whatever captures their interest in that moment. Their Instagram feeds are more diverse, yet still serving a single purpose.

Now think about how you take photos, or how you want to take photos? Remember your answer to that question as we get into the next part of this.

There are two ways to create a photography habit (of course there are more ways, but I can only think of two – if you can think of one, you do it another way):

Number 1

Choose a theme. Possible theme ideas:

  • Kids
  • Pets
  • Nature
  • Patterns
  • Black + White

Capture as many photographs as possible that fit into your theme. Aim for at least 20+ for the week or set a daily goal for yourself.

Number 2

Take a photo at the same time everyday for a set amount of time (a week, a month, etc.). Take a photograph each day this week at the same time. Before you get started, there are a few factors to take into consideration.

  • What time of day will you take your photographs? Choose a time that is convenient for you and that you will realistically be able to take photos all week at that same time.
  • Will you photograph the same thing everyday or whatever you see at that time each day? For example, will I photograph my dog on our walk each night, or will I photograph something new I see each night when I am out walking my dog? How many to take? Will you take just 1 photograph and live with it? Or, will you shoot a bunch and choose the best?

Set an alarm or reminder on your phone so you don’t forget to take those photos!

You will notice that as you start to take more photos, your photography will improve. You will start thinking about the light, the background, etc. even if you really do not know anything about these. By trial and error (practice) you will improve your creativity.

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today – Creating a Photography Practice.

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today - Starting an ideas journal.

Creativity in 10: Start an Ideas Journal

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today – Starting an ideas journal.

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today - Starting an ideas journal.

Here’s the story.

If you missed it, last week I started a new series called Creativity in 10. The idea is to provide you with simple ways to practice your creativity in 10 minutes or less a day. Check out last week’s post about forming a writing habit here.

Most people like the idea of being creative and practicing their creativity, but aren’t sure where to start or feel overwhelmed with all of the possibilities. So here is another simple way to practice your creativity – start an ideas journal.

You can go about this a couple of different ways. On one hand, an ideas journal is just somewhere you write down your ideas when you have them – a little notebook you keep in your pocket or purse, a Google Doc you return to online, or even just sending yourself an email with your ideas. It’s a spot to collect and organize your ideas so that you can return to them later and iterate on them.

Even more than that, this is the practice of writing down ideas. It’s very difficult to come up with good ideas on demand, especially if you are not practicing it regularly.

Getting Started With an Ideas Journal

Each day, Set the timer for 10 minutes and come up with as many ideas as possible in that time. Anything you want to focus on – whether it’s ideas for how to keep your house clean, how to save more money, your next sewing project, the novel you want to write – it doesn’t matter what your ideas are about.

You are either going to set a timer and come up with as many ideas as possible. Write down every idea that comes to mind. Do not edit yourself. Do not decide if they are good ideas, bad ideas, etc. Just write everything down.

Or, you can set an ideas goal. This is where you keep going until you hit a certain number of ideas per day (5, 10, or whatever). Once again, do not edit. Chances are that most of your ideas will be crap. Utter garbage. But, you don’t need that many good ideas, just one or a few. If you actually do this everyday, amongst all this garbage will be a few pieces of gold.

So how do you do it? Easier said than done, right?

Set an alarm on your phone for a time when you know you can work on this – first thing in the morning, during your lunch hour, right before bed. When that alarm goes off, you are Pavlov’s dog. You hear the alarm, you write your ideas down.

Or, you can just put it on your calendar as a repeating event for the next 30 days. So everyday you see it and know it is something you need to accomplish.

Figure out which of these options works for you and start practicing your creativity today!

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today - Starting an ideas journal.

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today - Forming a Writing Habit.

Creativity in 10: Form a Writing Habit

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today – Forming a Writing Habit.

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today - Forming a Writing Habit.

Here’s the story.

A few days ago I realized that I am writing so much more than any other creative activity. Which is crazy. About a year ago I shared something that basically said I didn’t even like writing. So why the change?

When I said that I didn’t like to write it’s because I was not actually writing much at that time – therefore I definitely wasn’t any good at it. This is not too say that I am the best writer now, but writing is coming so much easier to me now because I practice it EVERY SINGLE DAY. I committed to write every day and I followed through with it (i.e. I practiced it.). It’s not a concept that is difficult to understand – it actually could not be any simpler. I wanted to be better at something so I practiced and as a result I improved.

Then why do we struggle with it so much? (Myself included.) Why do we struggle to start new creative practices knowing that all we have to do to improve is commit some time and energy to it.

Since November or December my creativity has shifted and morphed and it’s been pretty interesting to witness. I am about ¾ of the way through the first draft of a non-fiction book I am writing and I have so many ideas for a novel I want to write. Now truthfully, all of my ideas + writing could be total garbage, but that’s not really the point.

A few months back I might have told that you that I had no desire to ever write a book – that was true at the time. Now I am really enjoying the process. So what changed? I did. I committed to a writing practice and that coincided with me having an idea for a book that I thought was a pretty good one. I have been able to get so much done because I write every single day. Now let me be clear, I have never sat down and written for hours at a time, I don’t think I have ever even sat down and written for more than 15 minutes at a time. At this current point in my life, I don’t have that kind of time. I have been writing in 5 or ten minute chunks.

I share this because often we hesitate to start a new project/hobby because we are going to be bad at it at first. Our work won’t look like work of the people that inspire us. We can’t see a few months into the future of how consistent practice can change that, we are too focused on the right here and right now. So this is my reminder to you that things can change with practice. So go practice already.

Here’s one easy, quick way to start today.

Creativity in 10

This will be a recurring series where I share an idea for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less. Even though ten minutes (or less) is not a significant amount of time, when you add it up over weeks, months, or even years – you will see progress in your creative practices. 

Form a Writing Habit

To form a writing habit you just have to commit to writing however often you choose for a certain amount of time o a certain amount of words/pages. If you are someone who likes to write, then obviously this is a great way for you to practice your creativity. At the same time, if you are not someone who traditionally loves to write, it’s a great way for you to improve your writing. And finally, if you are someone who doesn’t have strong feelings about it one way or another, it’s a way to continually generate new ideas and to think through the ideas that you already have. Remember, no one has to see your writing if you don’t want them to.

Here’s how to get started:

Decide where you are going to store your writing: a journal, on your computer, etc. I have a Google Doc labeled 250 Words that is currently about 60 pages long. I write there everyday.

Decide how often you are going to write: daily, weekly, only on weekends, only on weekdays. As always, you truly need to figure out what works for you, but if you will allow me to get on my soapbox for a quick minute: I think you should make it a daily practice. The only way to form a habit is to do it EVERY SINGLE DAY. In addition, if your writing practice is only on the weekends and you miss a day, that’s half of your writing for the week, whereas if you have a daily practice and you miss a day, it’s not a big deal. I’m getting down off my soapbox.

Decide what your daily writing goal is going to be: a specific number of words, a specific amount of time, etc. Do whatever works for you, but my daily goal is 250 words (which is not very much at all).

Decide how to remind yourself to write: add it to your calendar or set an alarm on your phone. You can set an alarm on your phone for a time when you know you can write – first thing in the morning, during your lunch hour, right before bed – whatever. When that alarm goes off, you are Pavlov’s dog. You hear the alarm, you start writing and don’t stop until you hit your goal. Or, you can add it to your calendar as a repeating event for the next 30 days. So everyday you see it and know it is something you need to accomplish.

How to actually get started: Once you have decide everything I mentioned above, it’s time to actually write. When you first start it can be difficult. So if you don’t already have something in mind for what you want to write about, just write whatever pops into your head – even if it is very stupid or it looks something like this:

I have to write 250 words today, so I am going to write until I get to 250 words. I am writing in a Google Doc. It is raining outside.

So obviously that is total garbage, but some days it will look like that and some days even though your goal is to write 250 words, you might easily write a thousand. Either way you have to show up and get it down each day so that you can see progress.

Start writing!

Creativity in 10 is a recurring series sharing ideas for how you can practice your creativity in ten minutes or less a day. Up today - Forming a Writing Habit.