Home » Blog » Creativity: Your Way

Creativity: Your Way

Compare how you currently practice your creativity and how you want to be practicing your creativity. Use the following exercises to take a closer look at your creativity and how you want to be practicing it.

YARN HEADER

Here’s the story.

Sometimes when we see all of the cool creative things other people are doing, we automatically start to compare our creativity to theirs. That’s when the doubt creeps in – this is especially true (but not limited to) if you are just getting started with your creativity or just getting started with a new creative practice.

In order to help build up your creative confidence, it can helpful to look at what you already do. I know, you might be thinking: I don’t practice my creativity because I’m not creative.

It’s my job to tell you that you are wrong. I’ll prove it.  

Exercise #1

Take a look at the examples below. Think about your unique skillset and what you bring to the table. The following are examples of creative projects. If you were to collaborate with someone on them – what would be your biggest contribution? It might not be the most obvious, but what creative strengths do you bring to the table?

You are throwing a party for someone. What part of the party-planning process is your strength?

Is it coming up with fun ideas? Making the invitations? Planning and making the food? Being an amazing host? Photographing the party?

You are buying a house and renovating it. What part of the process is your strength?

Negotiating a price for the house? ALL of the paper work involved in buying the house? Designing the renovations? Completing the actual renovations? Decorating the house when the renovations are done?

You are collaboratively writing and publishing a children’s book. What part of the process is your strength?

Generating ideas for a story? Writing the story? Illustrating the story? Teaching yourself how to get the book published? Marketing the book?

You are planning and embarking on a trip to a foreign country. What part of the process is your strength?

Deciding where to go? Figuring out how to save money for the trip? Finding reviews and making reservations for where to stay? Planning what to do when you are there? Learning some of a new language so you aren’t completely lost on the trip? Documenting your trip as you are on it. Putting your trip memories together once you get home?

You are landscaping your yard. What part of the process is your strength?

Tearing out the current landscaping? Design and plan what you are going to plant or construct? Planting new stuff?

You are making a family video. What part of the process is your strength?

Taking the photos and videos? Editing the video? Deciding on music?

What you can learn from this?

First, if you were able to circle anything in any of the examples, then you are in fact creative. (I told you I would prove you wrong). Success!

Second, look back at what you wrote down or circled from each example. Do you see any patterns forming? When you look back at your answers from each example do you notice any similarities?

When I look at my answers, I saw a lot of generating ideas, researching and designing answers. This makes sense for how I currently practice my creativity.

We’re not done yet.

Exercise #2

Look back at these examples, but this time, instead of circling your current strengths, circle the examples of what you want to be your strengths – how you WANT TO PRACTICE YOUR CREATIVITY.

You are throwing a party for someone. What part of the party-planning process do you want to be your strength?

Is it coming up with fun ideas? Making the invitations? Planning and making the food? Being an amazing host? Photographing the party?

You are buying a house and renovating it. What part of the process do you want to be your strength?  

Negotiating a price for the house? ALL of the paper work involved in buying the house? Designing the renovations? Completing the actual renovations? Decorating the house when the renovations are done?

You are collaboratively writing and publishing a children’s book. What part of the process do you want to be your strength?

Generating ideas for a story? Writing the story? Illustrating the story? Teaching yourself how to get the book published? Marketing the book?

You are planning and embarking on a trip to a foreign country. What part of the process do you want to be your strength?

Deciding where to go? Figuring out how to save money for the trip? Finding reviews and making reservations for where to stay? Planning what to do when you are there? Learning some of a new language so you aren’t completely lost on the trip? Documenting your trip as you are on it. Putting your trip memories together once you get home?

You are landscaping your yard. What part of the process do you want to be your strength?  

Tearing out the current landscaping? Design and plan what you are going to plant or construct? Planting new stuff?

You are making a family video. What part of the process do you want to be your strength?  

Taking the photos and videos? Editing it? Deciding on music?

What you can learn from this?

For me, something that jumped out was while I seem to practice my creativity by generating ideas, researching, and designing – I really just want to make stuff. In just about every example, I chose something that actually has to do with making.

How about for you? Did you once again see patterns forming in your answer for each example?

Putting It All Together

Take what you learned about yourself in exercise #1 (how you are already creative) and combine them with exercise #2 (how you want to be creative). Reflect on it – are they the same? Are they completely different? Is there some overlap?

There is some discrepancy from how I actually practice my creativity and what I really want to be doing with my creativity. One of the examples that jumped out at me was illustrating a children’s book. This practice is not even close to being in my wheelhouse. Although, over the past few months I have taken great strides learning how to draw and and being brave enough to share some of my drawings, actually illustrating a children’s book is a long way off.

Truthfully, I wish I was an amazing illustrator. I think children’s books are the best. I have a number of them that I think every adult should read – the stories are amazing and the illustrations are even better. This is definitely an area that interests me. So how can I go from just wanting to be good at something to actually being good at something?

Stay tuned. My next post will show you how to bridge that gap.

CREATIVITY YOUR WAY

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *